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Islamic law

In the wake of the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Muslim academic Jonathan Brown argued that Muslims would respect same-sex unions if sharia-based marriages were respected in return. He rejects the case for Muslim same-sex unions for reasons that include the classical definition of marriage, texts on Lot's people and the allied prohibition of anal sex.
The movement to ban foreign and/or religious law, according to the New York Times, is the brainchild of an Islamophobic lawyer, David Yerushalmi, who has been described by the Anti-Defamation League as having a record of "anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant and anti-black bigotry.
Islamic law did not seek to regulate feelings, emotions and urges, but only its translation into action that authorities had declared unlawful. Indeed, many scholars -- including prominent 11th century jurist Abu Muhammad Ali Ibn Hazm -- even argued that homosexual tendencies themselves were not haram but had to be suppressed for the public good.
It's been referred to as "an unlikely weapon in the war:" a joyous fragrance at the beauty counter made from organic essential oils that help farmers in Afghanistan get off of the illegal poppy crop that accounts for 90 per cent of the world's heroin supply.