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ivf

“A man ejaculates into a cup, and someone is making five grand."
There are additional stressors for sexual and gender minorities.
The once futuristic idea of designer babies remains a subject of speculation and intense ethical debate.
It's currently illegal to pay, offer to pay or advertise payment for sperm, eggs, or surrogacy services.
Even though my son is not a pure genetic relation, I could not possibly love him any more than I already do.
Two recent studies showed that fresh and frozen embryo transfer were equally effective.
It is an exciting new technology for women who want to balance their fertility options with their careers
As a fertility doctor, I hear a lot of misconceptions.
I never imagined I'd be posting a pre-surgery selfie in hospital scrubs looking like a scared animal about to go under general anesthesia for a procedure on my uterus.
As a fertility specialist, one of the most common sentiments I hear is, "I was careful my whole life not to get pregnant and now that I am ready, I can't believe it is this difficult!" Contrary to what your high school sex ed teacher would have had you believe, the chances of pregnancy with intercourse are not 100 per cent every month.
Open up almost any magazine, website or video, and you're likely to hear a story about the struggles couples have with infertility and the measures they take to have a baby of their own. As a mother of four, I was lucky enough to be able to conceive easily and naturally, and it is only through speaking with friends and colleagues that I understand the challenges many couples face in trying to have a family.
December 21, 2016 marks the first anniversary of the launch of the Ontario Fertility Program. Designed to improve access to assisted reproduction technologies for the one in six Ontarians living with infertility, the program contributes to the medical costs required for procedures such as intrauterine insemination (IUI), fertility preservation (FP) and in vitro fertilization (IVF).
The controversial in-vitro procedure is considered a breakthrough.
"There's no right or wrong way to bring a loved child into the world."
Each week, I sit in my office counselling couples and consulting with them about loss. Loss of the idea that they will have a biological child. By the time couples come in to see me for counselling, often they have been trying unsuccessfully, for years, to conceive a biological child.
"God heard our prayers. My life feels complete now."
Despite my deep longing to be a mother, I am somehow feeling more resigned now as we wait to hear the verdict of our fourth cycle. I feel much less desperate, much less crazed about it working. Because chances are it didn't, no matter how hard I wish it did. My hope feels irrelevant and in relinquishing it I feel more prepared this time. I am steeling myself off, encasing my heart, bracing myself for bad news.
No part of me regrets the decision I made to be an egg donor but I regret how I went about it and the contract I locked myself into. I regret not requesting an open donation. I did not understand the gravity of my decisions. I believed I was mature and now I look back and feel like I was just a kid. That psychological screening, many years ago, had "screened" a version of myself I could no longer relate to. I had no way of knowing that egg donation would impact my life the way it did.
There's much to commend in the new policy; most importantly it covers all forms of infertility, regardless of sex, gender, sexual orientation or family status. The problem lies in what has not yet been addressed by the province -- critical issues that surround both publicly and privately funded IVF -- that demand attention.