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jihad

This persecution has personally affected me and continues to cause me great pain, grief and sorrow. I'd like to fall in love with Pakistan again, but something holds me back. It seems to be fear of continuing to lose those that I love most. And so, I have to ask, O Pakistan, when will you stop?
A fundamental question that often arises here is what's Islamist extremism? The roots of Islamist extremism stem out of the concept of armed Jihad, which endorses the idea of domination of Islam through armed struggle. The very same concept is being adopted by ISIL.
If our social media profiles can tint in support of Paris, Belgium, and Orlando, then why not change for Turkey, Bangladesh, and Iraq? Innocent lives taken in Turkey airport, and no vigils, or landmarks, but when an attack of similar degree took place in Brussels we did all of the above. I'm often asked why Muslims don't speak out enough, but perhaps this is something we all need to work on.
Is it too much to ask in the 21st century to self-identify based on the beliefs you hold so dearly? After all, who has the right to tell me who I am and who I'm not? Apparently the Pakistani government does, who have declared the Ahmadiyya community "infidel" and non-Muslim since the infamous ruling in 1974.
In recent years, we've seen terror attacks like the one last Tuesday become the norm. From attacks in Brussels and Paris to Turkey, Jakarta and even here in Canada, the global terror threat affects everyone -- and both Muslims and non-Muslims are not immune to it.
"Injustice anywhere, is a threat to justice everywhere." These words of Martin Luther King Jr. accurately describe the world crisis we live in today. To avoid war and attacks as such, all nations must come together for the greater good and unite in their efforts to stop all forms of cruelty, persecution and injustice perpetrated in the name of religion or else wise.
Journalist Gwynne Dyer's book Don't Panic: ISIS, Terror and Today's Middle East rests on the premise that ISIS poses no major threat to the Western world. Dyer suggests the West is not affected by events in Syria and must not be involved in the civil war. However, there is a moral imperative that we need to acknowledge.
In both the U.S. and Canada, Muslims face real scrutiny, fanned by politicians out to earn xenophobic votes and media folk out to sell copies. North American society, on both sides of the border, needs to get to grips with five key misconceptions if it wants to contribute to a clean, prejudice-free society.
A United Airlines flight travelling to Denver had to return to Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C. due to a
Throughout the Cold War there was no two meanings of the word "Jihad." Both the USSR and the USA knew what it meant -- Islamic
Dr. Khalid Sohail's book, From Holy War to Global Peace published by Multiline Publications Lahore, is a timely and effective
So many young Canadians are looking to make their mark on the world. Some pick up a shovel to build a school or a ladle in soup kitchens to serve the homeless. A small number choose a different way, traveling to Syria to pick up an AK-47. Where does the road diverge between the youth who choose the path of helping and those on the path of harm? And for those on the road toward extremism, are there points along their journey where they might be set on a positive path?
We must move beyond being revolted by the beheadings because that is the singular reaction ISIS seeks from those who do not respond by becoming recruits. Young radicals leaving Canada are individuals. We must see them as individuals and not just caricatures.
What is happening in Toronto four years later is the same game that was played out in New York City in 2010. Its part of the soft-jihad waged by Islamists and their left-wing allies, one that uses Islam and multiculturalism to whip up an anti-West sentiment among Muslim youth and create symbols that can be seen as a middle finger to the "Great Satan."
As a Muslim, I can say without fear, the latest terror attack -- the brutal hacking death of a British soldier by two fearless jihadis chanting "Allah O Akbar" -- has a basis in Islam. It's time for us Muslims to dig our heads out of the sand.
In a frightening display of rising sectarian violence, an atheist suicide bomber blew himself up on a busy street in Stockholm three days ago; killing eighteen agnostics and wounding over thirty. Members of the 'Swedish Atheistic Liberation Front' (SALF) have claimed responsibility for the bombing. Declaring the attack as revenge against the explosive agnostic riots, which, last week, hospitalized several atheists and terrorized the atheistic community.
The RCMP, FBI and CSIS are all working diligently to protect the public from such monstrous agendas. However, something must also be done to counter this evil at the idelogical level, where plots to murder innocents are hatched.
Liberal leader Justin Trudeau may be searching for "root causes," but some of us Muslims who are not blinded by a hate of the West know the root cause is Islamism -- political Islam -- that seeks to destroy the West and establish an Islamic supremacist caliphate.
Members of the audience at the launch of my new book exchanged ideas on modernizing or "moderating" Islam. Was there indeed a window of opportunity to interpret Islam's precepts in line with modern sensibilities on women's rights? Was there potential to change people's attitudes on the status of minorities in Muslim countries?
An unprecedented protest is unfolding in the Balochistan city of Quetta in Pakistan. Thousands of people have staged a sit-in, and are using 93 coffins to block a road to protest the slaughter of Shia Muslims by Sunni Muslim terrorists allied with the Taliban. In their demise is a warning to the rest of us. A nuclear power is about to collapse.