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job search tips

You know the drill: You submitted your job application, complete with a cover letter and resume. You were selected for an interview. Then you headed to your potential-future-employer to shake some hands and answer every single interview question. But what if some of those questions seem a little ... off?
In the day and age of emails, you need to find a way to stand out - and the thank-you letter just might be your gateway to do so. If done poorly, however, it could also mark the end of your rat race.
You need to be absolutely sure you want to leave if you are to move your career ahead versus sideways. The thought that, "I'll see what's out there and then decide" can be a waste of your time, not to mention the people who interview you. Your job performance will suffer and your stress will be extended.
With recruiters spending an average of 10 seconds on an initial scan of your resume, it's crucial that you are able to capture their attention quickly. If you fail to make an impact within the first few seconds, then you may find that many recruiters skip over your resume -- without even reading it.
Job searches are stressful, right? They don't have to be. Conducting a job search can be an empowering experience if you do it the right way.
Even though you want people to know you are looking for work. No one is going to conduct a search for someone "seeking a job". It is completely understandable to want your network to know you are looking for work. You want your network to look out for you and be aware of your employment status or lack thereof but you are doing yourself a disservice.
Every person reacts to a layoff in a different way. In the immediate aftermath, you'll likely experience a range of emotions, from sadness to anger, to fear and frustration -- possibly even relief. And at some point while you're processing this unexpected life change, you'll be met with a big question: Now what?
Hiring seasons might seem like myths, but they exist. Understanding when managers at companies will likely have open job positions can be crucial for everyone looking for careers
You can convey your competence and confidence, your job-readiness, to an employer much more impressively with the questions you ask than the ones you answer. Smart questions can demonstrate that you have some knowledge of the industry, and that you're already thinking about how you can contribute to it.
There is no denying there is a lot of displeasure regarding how candidates are treated and there is no doubt in my mind some agencies should be shut down! But even the best of the best of us out there are double-edged swords. We are great when we have something for you but useless if we don't and this is not our fault.
The first impression that employers most often have of candidates is through their resume. It is critical to stand out from the crowd of generic applications with a document that really sells your skills and accomplishments. This deserves more than a cut and paste of new job details into an old template.
There is no perfect way to find a job, and you cannot predict what will get you your next job. The job search can get frustrating, especially, if you see your peers getting ahead. You may begin to wonder what is wrong with you. Don't worry. Try these useful tips for gaining the "competitive advantage."