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Kofi Annan

Shimon Peres was the last towering figure from Israel's founding generation -- and he is now gone. But in a very real sense he lives on by providing us an example of how one can cast off positions in the face of changing circumstances. And to be courageous. And to dare to dream that we can one day have peace on earth.
France and Germany generously pledged 1 billion dollars each. All in all, leaders agreed to mobilize more than US$200 billion worth of financial assets by the end of 2015. For the first time, indications of stronger strides in the right direction came from the U.S. and China, particularly in terms of their responsibility to lead on efforts to curb emissions.
Is it just us, or does the world feel a bit scarier lately? The world needs experienced leaders -- grizzled global firefighters with the wisdom to staunch the flames and guide us through turbulent times. One is Kofi Annan, former Secretary-General of the United Nations.
About 70 per cent of the Egyptian population is under 30 years old. If we want Egypt to change then each and every one must be a part of this change we want to see. The youth needs to be engaged in the decision making process in order for Egypt to reach stability.
Recently, I had the privilege of hearing Kofi Annan speak in New York. Freed from the constraints of office, armed with a newly-written book and perspective to view the world a little closer to the ground than from his previous perch on the 52nd floor of the UN building would allow, there was a sharper edge to him.
After a year or so of killing people in areas that protest his dictatorship, Assad apparently has agreed to withdraw troops from killing zones -- starting some 10 days after making his promise to former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. What the hiatus does is give Syrian forces breathing space to further crush anti-government elements and destroy towns that harbour rebels.
The recent six-point multilateral agreement on Syria is a breakthrough for those seeking to end the country's horrific yearlong bloodbath. But despite overwhelming agreement that the killing must stop, a lack of shared opinion on whom or what to support now threatens to dash any hope of a ceasefire taking effect.