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Leona Aglukkaq

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May says Aglukkaq should have stayed home.
"That was quite a patronizing statement made by the prime minister."
Two years ago, Ecojustice and our clients celebrated a landmark win for protection of B.C.'s iconic killer whales under the Species at Risk Act. And while there have been some recent signs that these populations may be on the long road to recovery, proposed projects like the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and now the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 expansion pose new threats to their survival.
Recent cuts to Environment Canada's operating budget have left the department a shadow of its former self and unable to enforce what little environmental laws are left. The Harper Government has burned enough environmental legislation to keep the Minister warm for an entire winter in her home in chilly Gjoa Haven. Nero fiddles while Rome burns.
Timmins-James Bay NDP MP Charlie Angus lambasted Aglukkaq on Twitter: Like Us On Facebook Follow Us On Twitter ALSO ON HUFFPOST
Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq says she is reviewing legal options over comments a Nunavut politician made about her
When the United States and China announced an historic agreement to curb greenhouse gas emissions last week, many said Canada
Frequent turnover at the head of a Department in the Public Service, sometimes referred to as Canada's Permanent Government, is almost never a good sign. It is often indicative of some serious friction at the highest level which almost inevitably reverberates throughout the department. It is therefore concerning but not surprising that Michael Martin is just the latest Deputy Minister at the Department of the Environment.
Astute readers of the Harry Potter series and keen political observers may see parallels to the current Harper Government™ as it seems to operate in a parallel universe clinging to its fantasies, denying obvious facts, and not helping Canadians adapt to the profound changes climate disruption will inevitably bring. Minister Aglukkaq is entitled to her fantasies; however she is not entitled to the facts.
Climate change has emerged as the single most important issue of our time, and it is nothing short of baffling that this government has chosen to bury its head in the sand and hope it goes away. Not only has the Harper government ignored the issue, but it has also gone to great lengths to suppress further research and any meaningful remedial or mitigating action. When Stephen Harper took office in 2006, he promised that we would not recognize Canada when he was done with it. He is on-track to keep that promise. For the sake of my grandchildren and all of us Muggles, I hope that Canadians prove him wrong in 2015.
Opponents of the proposed Site C dam are hoping a report from the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency panel, to be released Thursday, will emphasize potential environmental damage from the massive dam and persuade the federal and provincial governments that the project should be scrapped.
Despite the fact that the Tsilhqot'in and Secwepemc are opposed to the New Prosperity mine, the B.C. Liberal government continues to support the project. This is both profoundly troubling and inconsistent with their commitments to First Nations.
British Columbia is blessed with a vast array of natural resources; mining has and will continue to have a profound influence on the B.C. economy. But the reason why we have environmental assessments is to ensure that new mine developments meet certain criteria. Cutting red tape means expediting the assessment process, not undermining it.
Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq sparked debate Thursday by sharing a photo of a dead polar bear on Twitter and encouraging
The report from the Commissioner for the Environment goes on and on through painful chapter after painful chapter cataloguing, in great detail, highlighting failure after failure by the Harper government to address everything from biological diversity and the conservation of migratory birds to Recovery Planning for Species at Risk and Ecological integrity of National Parks.
responded to the CBC-Parks Canada agreement. McGuire wrote that Parks Canada paid CBC a grand total of $97,728.75, and the
After a long cold winter, Attawapiskat residents got a rude spring awakening -- an overwhelmed drainage system is swamping
For weeks now, Ontario's Minister of Health, Deb Matthews, has been trading barbs with federal Health Minister, Leona Aglukkaq, over whether or not she should intervene in Health Canada's decision to approve the generic version of the painkiller oxycodone. As this debate plays out and the attention starts to focus on the intergovernmental conflict instead of the important public health debate, we must not lose sight of three simple facts.
OTTAWA — A family doctor crashed a funding announcement by Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq Wednesday as part of an aggressive
In recommendations released today, the UN Committee Against Torture slammed Canada's treatment of prisoners with mental health issues. Given that Canada is viewed by many as the "gold standard" in corrections, these findings are also an important reminder that serious problems remain within the Correctional Service of Canada.