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lianne castelino

These are all important principles that children need to be exposed to from a young age, that should come automatically as they get older, because it is part of the fibre of their being. That's because their parents - who are their first, most important and life-long teachers - have taught them these important lessons.
Having been through this process once, I can safely say it does NOT get any easier. Each child is different. End of story. Here's what I've observed and learned over the course of having one child and now the second apply for postsecondary education.
Maybe I was in an ultra-serious head space when I first saw the video of Robert Kelly's children enter the backdrop of their father's live interview with the BBC. I didn't laugh. I didn't see an ounce of humour in it, frankly. All I could think about was how horrified he must have felt, though he did an incredible job masking it.
Child poverty should make us all ashamed. Every single day that it continues to be a stark reality in this country should make each of us stop, think and be moved to action.
Calling out rudeness, a lack of etiquette or a complete absence of compassion or empathy in public should never have to happen -- but it MUST. The recent examples that made the headlines -- of a woman allegedly sitting on the feet of a passenger whose feet dangled over an empty seat on public transit -- is a case in point.
Let's call it what it is -- young, black hockey players are few and far between in the National Hockey League. Rising to the top of his position in his short NHL career is also fairly unique. His parents immigrated from Jamaica to Sudbury, and PK did spend some of his childhood growing up in Northwestern Ontario. A minority there too, undoubtedly. He is one of three brothers playing in the NHL. Pretty unique as well. Subban is unabashedly different, and he owns it. That's worth admiring and emulating.
Should parents just stop trying to explain such inexplicable behaviour to children? Most adults don't understand it, how in the world can we be expected to explain it to our children. Is ignoring these types of utterly incomprehensible acts a better course of action to preserve the 'childhood innocence' that appears increasingly to be fleeting?
His unwavering principle is something to marvel at. Principle supported by action. He didn't just talk the talk (which in itself he was highly-skilled it and evidenced in a litany of piercing quotes). He backed it up with action -- which was usually followed by some degree of conviction and courage -- cause being your own man is usually a road riddled with potholes, even in the best of times.
Manners are increasingly taking a back seat and it shows. What stuns me is how completely oblivious people are to their own lack of manners in a given situation, but how quick they are to point out ill-mannered others. Time to take an etiquette selfie. You might be aghast at what you see.