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local food

Reinvesting in your own village, town, city and country is more beneficial to you and your children than supporting large, international corporations.
Are you grateful for your food? Here's how to really get present about your plate.
Our food-obsessed culture is more interested than ever in sourcing their food locally, and local food experiences have become one of the primary travel motivators. Through a comprehensive study, we discovered the rise of food tourism is driven by the values of the modern consumer, specifically millennials, who look for immersive travel experiences.
This experience certainly made me slow down a bit and put more thought into where it is I'm getting my food, who I'm supporting and what I'm putting into my body. It is a way to get involved in and share our culture and traditions, and enjoy the love and nourishment that good wholesome foods provide.
As I travel, I'm learning how dire it is when these companies with massive international funds behind them invade and usurp regional cultures with global products that have no soul, no passion, and certainly no emotional resonance for those regions.
In May 2015, the French government did something incredible: the National Assembly unanimously passed a law forcing large supermarkets to donate unsold food to charities. That's how the #WhatAWaste campaign -- a grassroots effort to pressure Canada's political leaders to follow France's example -- was born.
A recent survey from LoyaltyOne found that 87 per cent of consumers said they'd be willing to pay more for their groceries if more local foods were available. It's this buying power that drives big box stores and grocery chains to offer more local and organic foods.
The Peasant Table is self-described as a gastropub that specializes in Northern Italian cuisine and includes regional influences from the Adriatic Sea and Eastern Europe. The owner, Chef Boris Babic, is a veteran of Canada's culinary scene for over 20 years.
With the arrival of summer, many Canadians are embracing fresh, seasonal, local foods, but for families with picky eaters, it can be difficult to break away from routine shops. I've talked to a lot of families who find themselves stuck in these doldrums and are craving a change, but struggle to introduce new foods into their repertoire.
Since opening its doors in March this year, Cresta has sought to introduce Torontonians to a new concept. Rory West, the head bartender and sommelier, informs me that Cresta is the only restaurant in the city that designs the food menu around the wine list -- not the other way around.
Next week is Local Food Week in Ontario, a celebration of the rich agricultural bounty we're so lucky to have access to in this province. The local food movement has been all the rage for the past few years, and shows no signs of stopping anytime soon. Grocery stores highlight local produce when it's in season, innumerable "farm to table" restaurants have popped up, and farmers markets continue to grow in popularity.
What were once staples of daily living in our communities -- butchers, bakers, fishmongers, and greengrocers -- are now seen as inefficient when large chain grocery stores deliver all-in-one convenience. But "fast and convenient" has weakened our communities. As the African proverb says, "If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together."
The Chase Fish & Oyster, the more relaxed sister of the upscale Chase fine dining spot, is the latest restaurant to throw their Sunday brunch hat in the proverbial ring. Having just debuted their menu at the end of April, I had a chance to taste a few of the menu items.
Fifteen years ago, Twesigye Jackson Kaguri, a native Ugandan, was living the American dream -- until his brother, and then his sister, died of HIV/AIDS. Coming face to face with the scale of Uganda's HIV/AIDS pandemic, Kaguri took the $5000 he had saved for a down payment on his own home and built Nyaka Primary School.
Over the past few years, the terms 'organic' and 'sustainable' have become buzzwords for health. But these words go beyond a person's health. Supporting local organic food and farming can help revitalize the economy. Community-based agriculture has the potential to create jobs and develop small businesses. Encouraging locals to stay healthy is the side job.
Opt for a few aces up your sleeves this Valentine's Day. To add some context to this statement, I reference a timeless adage: "The way to someone's heart is through their stomach." There's no denying the truth in those words. Attaining culinary success in spades can guarantee you affection in return.
Suss and Kupfert's aim is just to offer another choice to the city -- not just for vegetarians and vegans, but for those who are seeking quality foods to enrich their diets with. Even the most staunch of carnivores can enjoy meals here (points at self)
With farm-to-table goods, I find the taste is cleaner, richer and I always feel more energized. That's partly because I don't need to eat as much to feel full. I'm getting more for every mouthful. That's because our bodies crave nutrition from what they're taking in. If our food is low in nutrients, it can often leave us feeling hungry for more. Like something vital is missing.
Do you rock skinny jeans and dark-rimmed glasses on a near-daily basis? Or are you someone who's passionate about the environment and sustainability? If so, you're probably interested in what Canadian universities are doing to foster and support these sub-cultures.