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manufacturing jobs

The combination of four factors, globalization, outsourcing, automaton, and the increasing adaptation and use of artificial intelligence is taking a growing toll on the low-income and middle-class sections of the society in developed countries, which is prompting the debate for the introduction of universal basic income.
In one week, Unifor will begin its first-ever round of bargaining with the Detroit Three automakers in what may be the most important round of bargaining to take place in the sector in more than a generation. The employers should be going in these talks with their eyes wide open.
Steel manufacturing in Canada is a $14-billion-per-year industry that currently supports 20,000 direct jobs, with another 100,000 indirect jobs tied to the sector. Tens of thousands of steel industry retirees rely on the continued viability of their pension plans for a dignified retirement and protection from dire poverty.
This will be the first generation of Canadians in our history to be worse off than their parents. That blunt fact is the new reality of our country, where seven per cent of workers are officially jobless (and much more if hidden unemployment is included) and youth unemployment stands at over 13 per cent. And that reality is a direct result of the policies and actions of this Conservative government and the Mulroney government that came before it. Friday's headlines point to the 26,000 auto parts jobs at risk as Harper drives ahead to sign the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal.
A small town of 16,000 people in southwestern Ontario, Tillsonburg's history is famously celebrated in Stomping Tom Connor's distinctive drawl when he sung about making seven dollars a day in the tobacco fields. But in 2009 the Green Energy Act spurred on the development of renewable energy with guaranteed rates for renewable energy producers.
As the country's leading staffing agency, we're able to identify trends shaping the world of work before they become official statistics. In analyzing our own data and combining it with anecdotal evidence from employers we work with, we've identified four key areas to watch as the year plays out.
Dear Ford Motor Company of Canada, I am very disappointed to hear that talks have been called off on the sale of the St. Thomas Ford assembly plant lands. Families relied on those jobs.
After two months of shrinking job numbers, it looked like Canada had broken the streak with this morning’s StasCan report
Canada’s manufacturing sector is experiencing something of a recovery. The loonie is down, helping exports, and the U.S. economy
The foundations of Ontario’s job market are turning into quicksand that threatens to swallow the province’s economic future
Heinz shuts down its plant in Leamington, Ont., laying off more than 700 and ending a 104-year-long presence in the town
While Canada's energy businesses are booming, the country's manufacturing sector is dying a slow death. Unfortunately, anytime someone pipes up about this, Western Canadian policymakers demand a quick end to the debate. But if we don't address the issue now, we'll face a much larger employment problem in the future.
Canada no longer knows how to sell anything to the world except oil and gas. Okay, that’s an exaggeration, but if things
When Wal-Mart is spearheading a manufacturing renaissance in the U.S., you know that the recession is dragging on. Since 2008, many economists have noted that this is the "jobless recovery." I know people who used to have one living wage job, who now have several part-time jobs and are scrambling every month to make ends meet.
Ontario desperately needs a bold plan to create jobs for the 21st century. We need to replace the 300,000 manufacturing jobs lost in the last decade. Ontario needs to invest in where the puck is going: the cleantech and low carbon economy. Do we have the courage and vision to skate there?
When it comes to solar panel manufacturing the laws of supply and demand may as well be Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. Just ask the former president of one of the largest solar photo-voltaic module manufacturers in Canada. He's an affable, friendly guy who got started in the solar industry 24 years ago.
North American manufacturing is bouncing back, but it's still a far cry from a complete recovery. After a tough few years
Canadian manufacturing sales may have rebounded to near pre-recession levels, but the same cannot be said of manufacturing
Just because something is a bit complicated, it doesn't mean you can ignore it, especially when it's hurting you. Thanks to increased oil production, we now have a petro-dollar that rises and falls with the price of oil. And, with oil being a finite commodity, its price will only rise, taking our dollar and manufacturing jobs in Ontario and Quebec along with it.