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Marc and Craig Kielburger

Earlier this summer, Canada's first transitional housing dedicated to LGBT youth opened in Toronto--the YMCA's Sprott House. Reading about this great initiative raised our awareness about an issue that needs to be on the radar of all Canadians -- the unacceptable rate of LGBT youth who have no place to call home. LGBT youth become homeless for much of the same reasons as other young people -- family conflict, abuse, mental health issues and addiction. LGBT youth also experience higher rates of mental health and addiction issues in large part because of discrimination.
Every week, more than a half-million Canadians miss work because of mental health problems, costing the Canadian economy over $50 billion a year. So there's good reason why the Economic Club of Canada teamed up with business leaders and mental health organizations to launch the Wellth Management Mental Health at Work Challenge this fall in cities across the country.
It's Sin City meets Homeland with a touch of House of Cards; there's something for comic book junkies and global politics nuts, too -- and plenty of food for thought for the rest of us. #foodcrisis is a new graphic novel that portrays the collapse of the world's agricultural system in 2025.
In the film Crazy Stupid Love, Canadian actor and renowned ladies' man, Ryan Gosling, along with a hapless Steve Carell, both learn that finding true love requires a genuine effort to be more lovable. Perhaps today's corporations could use such a lesson.
September 8 is International Literacy Day, marked with events in schools and communities around the world, and highlighted by a United Nations celebration and conference in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Despite the promising gains of the UN's worldwide "Literacy as Freedom" decade that ended in 2012, more than 770 million people over the age of 15 cannot read or write.
Many teens spend their babysitting money on something to listen to --music downloads, movies or concerts. Morgan Baskin put hers into being heard. The 18-year-old high school senior is running for mayor of Canada's largest city. Amidst the international circus that is Toronto municipal politics, Baskin is a glimmer of hope.
Track down an old favorite by email or phone, and give the greatest gift a teacher can receive: the knowledge of their long-term impact, and where all their hours of extra care and effort got you.
Business is often seen by the non-profit sector and protest movements as the enemy of sustainable development in poor countries. But entrepreneurship is a key player in ending global poverty by reversing the cycle of dependency with a cycle of self-sufficiency and employment.
For us in the West, it's hard to imagine life without education. But what if you couldn't read the words on a basic contract, write your name on a job application, or count the money you earn at work? Imagine no one in your community knew how to prevent your crops from failing, basic accounting to run a family business, or how to treat a common illness.
The South African Reconciliation Barometer, a survey of racial and social attitudes, consistently finds a deeply divided nation. Less than 40 per cent of South Africans socialize with people of another race, while only 22 per cent of white South Africans and a fifth of black South Africans live in racially integrated neighbourhoods.
Inspired and compelled by celebrity luminaries including The Barenaked Ladies and Serena Ryder, as well as some particular youth favourites such as Demi Lovato and the Jonas Brothers, the feeling at We Day 2013 in the Air Canada Centre was electric.
In their book, My Grandma Follows Me On Twitter: And Other First World Problems We’re Lucky To Have, Craig and Marc Kielburger
Last year we wrote about this Haitian school program and the hope it held for Haitian families. Many of the free schools are not housed in their own permanent structures but in spaces loaned by churches or community groups. Some of these groups now refuse to host the schools because of poor upkeep -- for example vandalism by students, a side-effect of the often-absent teachers.