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measles

"Staggering" data reveals nearly 10 million infections in a single year.
Pertussis, or whooping cough, can be severe in kids and fatal in babies.
Most babies don't get their first measles vaccine until 12-15 months.
Despite the obvious benefits of vaccines, rumors about vaccines' link to autism have led to "vaccine hesitancy"
The early 20th century anti-vax argument was about freedom, conspiracies, pseudoscience and parental anxiety while nowadays...
Conflict attacks the systems that support the routines of daily life. The result is that, during conflict, millions of children miss out on the basic vaccines they need to stay healthy and have a fair chance in life. Most often the children affected are the most vulnerable to disease.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg As the temperature continues to plunge this winter, many Canadians will turn to scarves -- and more recently necktubes -- to keep their necks and faces warm. These swatches of fabric ensure those areas left open by jackets and coats are kept safe from the prevailing winds and wayward flakes of snow. Yet, they may serve another purpose as protectors of our health.
We know how to protect against measles and we have the tools to do it. In fact, at less than $2 each in low-income countries, the measles vaccine is one of the cheapest to deliver. Investments in the measles vaccine are considered one of the best buys in global health. Yet we are still coming up short and failing the world's most vulnerable children.
In 2010, there were 139,300 deaths worldwide due to measles, a disease that we had hoped to completely eradicate by 2020. One reason for this is that some prejudices that originally circulated in 1887 -- like that measles is a benign, inconsequential disease -- have survived over the ages. Another reason is that an unfortunately growing part of the population believes that vaccination may be more dangerous than the disease itself.
Effective.
Neal Cohen took to Facebook to share his thoughts with "all anti-vaxxers" when he thought his five-month-old daughter had measles.
In February 2015, a poll by the Angus Reid Institute revealed that two-thirds of Canadians believe that children should not be allowed to attend school or daycare if their immunizations are not fully up to date. Interestingly, the country is divided.
Recent measles outbreaks in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia have sounded alarm bells for parents. Is my child safe
While antivaxxer-related outbreaks keep happening in places once deemed measles-free, the disease was never eradicated in developing countries where it kills 400 children daily. But the measles patch could help save their lives.
Last month, the measles outbreak in California Disney parks sent parents into a flurry of panic. So far, 151 people from
There are 136 cases of measles in Quebec. The disease is spreading fast considering that this outbreak was allegedly caused by a single returnee from a Disney vacation where the outbreak started. Like a run away freight train, measles will jump person to person and eventually make it here. Is my son who had a heart transplant and can't be vaccinated protected? I sure hope so. If you don't want to vaccinate, don't. But when measles is out there, an airborne illness that is so easily spread, please keep your child home. Don't make choices for my child too.
As someone who has had both leukemia and measles as an indirect result of chemotherapy, I'm a firm believer in Western medicine (though I do enjoy organic kale juice from time to time). Watching the vaccination furor from afar, I've been thinking about the connection between this debate and the two First Nations girls from Ontario who opted to have "natural" therapies to treat their Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia instead of proven chemotherapies.
Every day when I see patients in my surgical clinic, some are offered a procedure to help them feel better. Whether it is a minor surgery like a tonsillectomy, or something larger scale such as tumor resection, I have a full discussion with the patient regarding the benefits and risks of doing "something." Each time I go over the common minor risks of an intervention and the exceedingly rare, but potentially very serious risks that can occur. I also review with them the risks of doing "nothing" - of what may happen if they don't have surgery. Vaccination is no different.
WHO recommends vitamin A supplements to improve child survival. Vitamin A supplements have been shown to reduce the number of deaths from measles by 50 per cent, in populations with vitamin A deficiency. For children who are vitamin A deficient or undernourished, it would seem a simple solution -- immunization against measles and better nutrition -- to save lives.