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meatless monday

No meat, no problem. If Meatless Monday sounds boring to you, that's because you've never heard of our flavourful and satisfying dishes! For many being a vegetarian is a lifestyle. For us, Meatless Monday is a reason to get creative in the kitchen while also keeping our health in mind.
Vancouver has long been a vegetarian-friendly town. Back in 2010, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals named the city the sixth most veg-friendly city in North America and number one in Canada. But Vancouver and the rest of B.C.'s Lower Mainland have become more than just a good place to buy a veggie burger.
Because not all meals require meat and cheese.
The stereotype of vegans and vegetarians as self-righteous, hectoring, spoilsports pushing their puritan agenda was never fair. Now that negative perception is disappearing altogether. The promotion of plant-based pleasure has arrived.
Every second of every day, over 2,400 land animals are killed for food. To add insult to injury, animal agriculture is one of the most significant contributors to climate change.
The rewards of eating conscientiously, healthfully, and humanely aren't exclusive to the planet and animals; happily, for everyone joining the meat, egg, and dairy-free movement this year, plant-based eating has never been easier or more enjoyable -- especially if you keep a few important tips in mind.
Legumes are high in fibre. Meat is not. Fibre helps lower cholesterol, which is helpful in the prevention of heart disease. Fibre also helps us have regular bowel movements, and helps control blood sugar levels and blood pressure, and keeps you feeling full for longer.
It may be hard to imagine something like chicken noodle soup or barbecued chicken wings without the meat, but let us assure
Meat-free grilling is a simple solution to a complex problem. Supply and demand issues and the outbreak of a deadly diarrheal virus on North American pig farms have sent meat prices through the roof in the last year. Yet the truth is, the meat on our supermarket shelves has been unrealistically cheap for a long time.
The production, transportation and storage of animal food products, especially red meat, greatly contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, affecting the amount of heat retained by the atmosphere. Reducing meat consumption in favor of plant-based eating would therefore help mitigate the environmental damage stemming from our dietary preferences.