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medical cannabis

The industry also wants Health Canada's regulations to be reviewed.
The lack of supply concerns Canadians who rely on the medicine.
We should leverage the success of our domestic model to address the gap in access to quality products worldwide.
There are many who ascribe the value of a sin tax to non-medical cannabis use. The argument for high taxation levels is to increase government revenues and discourage the use of an inebriating substance. Proponents of this argument might go as far as to say the more tax the better. This creates a problematic externality.
Bringing the public perception of marijuana to a place where women, especially moms, are comfortable being identified as cannabis users may not sound like a big deal, but this is about so much more than enabling more moms to get high - it's about data, health and wellness.
Shoppers Drug Mart and Loblaws recently made headlines by announcing they will cover medical cannabis for their employees. But the devil is always in the details. While these two chains should be praised for their progressive steps forward, we also need to ask who this coverage is provided for, how much is being covered, as well as how this fits with the overall long-term strategy to position pharmacies as the front-line dispensers of medical cannabis.
While to some extent, I believe homeowners should have some say in what happens in their rental properties, this needs to be balanced with the rights of individuals to grow their cannabis for medical purposes and have access to affordable medicine.
A U.S. report says many uncertainties remain about the plant's health and safety risks.
Pot. Dope. Weed. 420. Bud. Doobie. Toke. Even 15 years after marijuana was approved for legal medical use in Canada, the language describing it obscures, conceals and hides. Can cannabis shed its dubious and illicit past so that this compound can be looked at within a medical framework first, and a recreational one second?
The 23,500 square foot production facility in Paris, Ontario started off early in cultivation. As soon as their license to grow was granted, work began straight away. As part of a fully integrated medical marijuana and health care company, high standards must be held to carry on business under the regulations.
Wednesday's release of Health Canada's new medical cannabis regulations, the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations brings some big changes for patients. Perhaps the biggest is the reintroduction of statutes that allow Canadian patients to grow for themselves, or to designate someone to grow on their behalf.
The current debate and coverage focuses on legalization and regulation combining the interests of everyone from recreational users to growers to government. Without the interests of patients represented in this debate, we run the risk of establishing a future framework that is set up to fail and will require further modification.
Toronto Mayor John Tory has written a letter to the head of Municipal Licensing and Standards to ask for a report and recommendations for dealing with what he called the "verging on out of control" growth of medical marijuana dispensaries. Let's compare their health and safety impacts to industries that already exist.
I am sick and tired of being a young man living with a malignant cancer inside my head, terrified of having the seizure that could cost me my lifestyle and independence, sleepless nights before the six-month interval MRIs that tell me my fate and my future.
Last week we saw the Pharmacy Association weigh in on the future of medicinal cannabis distribution in Canada. They want in now, saying they should be the "front line" in dispensing the drug. It is an interesting reversal from their earlier position on medicinal cannabis, so let's try to understand why.
Mettrum's licensed production facilities span over 80,000 square feet of capacity, located on a total of over 80 acres of land. The Bowmanville location (one of two) is massive, and houses their client service team and part of the grow operations.
Once implemented, Bill 45 would put medicinal marijuana under the same regulations as tobacco products under the Smoke Free Ontario Act. I am in full agreement and support of the proposed changes to control the sale of e-cigarettes, but I can't agree with lumping in medicinal cannabis patients.
We've all experienced that annoyance, maybe on the bus, at work, in parks and malls in every corner of the province. Packs of medicinal cannabis users vaping their cannabis, wantonly blowing their cannabis vapour in our faces, laughing at us while they "get high." Call me sheltered, but I have never encountered it.
Wynne has called the new regulations "common sense," and Associate Health Minister Dipika Damerla has stated this "strikes a balance" between the rights of medical cannabis users and other Ontarians, but I fail to see a fair and just consideration of medical cannabis users' rights in the equation.
Honest conversations between doctors and patients are crucial in overcoming the barriers to real and effective healthcare solutions. It's time to replace the fear, stigma and misinformation too often associated with medical cannabis with science, reason and compassion.