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medical students

Election-cycle planning is utterly inadequate to meet the needs of Ontario's patients, which exceed a single government's lifespan by decades.
There are many reasons to explain the overuse of opioids, and as future physicians, we are aware that inappropriate prescribing practices are a clear and studied culprit. Yet for many of our patients across the country, there is more to the story.
When medical students don their white coats for the first time, they take an oath to devote themselves to the care of their future patients. My oath carried a commitment to 'ensure patient well-being as my main focus and my primary obligation.' Although I wholeheartedly appreciate the notion of caring for my patients with all my energy, to state that one's health aside from my own is my primary obligation speaks to the dangerous sacrifices expected of medical students.
Researchers estimate we lose more than 400 doctors per year in the U.S. to suicide (an entire med school) and 150 med students yearly. We're a highly regulated profession. Doctors are tracked endlessly and publicly shamed if we veer off course in any way, and if we die by suicide, suddenly it's like we never existed.
This week, I have the pleasure to feature an article written by two of my friends, who are passionate about global health
A few weeks ago, I had the chance to attend the 4th session of the UN Open Working Groups (OWG) on Sustainable Development Goals in New York as a delegate of the International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA), member of the Major Group of Children and Youth.
Today, as we celebrate the National Day of Action against the Refugees Healthcare cuts on June 17th, I decided to interview Benjamin Langer, a third-year medical student, to enlighten Canadian readers regarding the budget cuts in Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP).
Not so long ago, I was a fresh new medical student with a strong interest in global issues and a background on social activism