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medicare

It is time for change: what has gotten Canadian health systems to their present state will not be sufficient to get them where they need to go for the future.
Canadians will pay — either with their pocket books or with their health.
Because of the cuts in previous years, many walk-in clinics, pharmacies and specialists continue to deny services to refugees and refugee claimants based on the false assumption that they are not covered.
Other than driving doctors to activism that might even send them north across the border, threats to the Canadian system as a result of the Trump agenda relate less to the repeal of Obamacare and more to his intention to renegotiate NAFTA.
Surveys and polls often show Canadians are proud of our universal health system, which provides publicly funded care for doctor and hospital services. Canadians don't have to worry about filing for bankruptcy to get care for themselves or their families when they need it. But when it comes to prescription medications, our health system comes up short.
Hardly a week goes by without this thorny issue being disputed between federal and provincial governments - even now that the budget has been tabled. The simple solution is that health costs should be shared, 50-50. But this solution is far from simple and very misleading.
As Canadians, we are proud of our universal health care system, which provides publicly-funded essential doctor and hospital care based on need and not ability to pay. Unfortunately, our health system falls short when it comes to prescription medication.
The complexity of ageing arises because, as we age, we are more likely to have more than one illness and to take more than one medication. And as we age, the illnesses that we have are more likely to restrict how we live -- not just outright disability, but in our moving more slowly, or taking care in where we walk, or what we wear or where we go.
Since the inception of medicare in Canada, opinion polls in all parts of the country consistently show that a vast majority of Canadians believe in equal access to health care based on need, not ability to pay. Yet this is precisely what is at stake in the Charter challenge against medicare taking place in the B.C. Supreme Court this week.