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mentorship

Mentors have wisdom and share experiences. To me, that's what mentorship is: drawing from that wisdom and potentially learning from their successes.
People who leverage mentors are more successful than those who don't.
Troubled teens seem willing to self-sabotage every aspect of their potential future: not participating in class, staying up late, sleeping most of the day away and then missing school. The most frustrating part of this is that these same people are often very gifted in some ways and yet here they are... stuck.
These employees might have keenly accepted their job offer and tackled their assignments with gusto when they walked through the door on their first day. But after some time, experience and training, they might appear to be more confident than usual. You might notice signs of disengagement. What's an employer to do?
The youth of any society constitute the promise of the future -- and many of our youth are in trouble. They are growing up in a divided society with ethnic, gender and political tensions at seemingly combustible proportions -- not just south of the border, but in Canada too.
International Women's Day provides us with an opportunity to reflect on the achievements and contributions of women and how they continue to shape the future of women in leadership. There are two key areas that stand out in my mind that are crucial to moving the needle for women in leadership in the future.
For women in particular, we know we have a different challenge than men when it comes to getting to that often desired executive position in the workplace. If we're going to reach that summit, we may need to look for a boost, or be the ones doing the elevating.
In today's connected world, the Internet and social media can provide millions of more appropriate and qualified mentors. Indeed, the web has democratized mentorship and made it easier than ever to solicit guidance and advice from people all over the world who have previously beaten down a path much like the one you're trying to follow.
While many of us are fortunate enough to take education for granted, not everyone can get the education they need. I believe that technological and pedagogical innovation can help break down barriers and make learning more accessible, engaging and inspiring.
So what does a mentor do? Mentors are those generous people who are open to sharing their knowledge, wisdom, experience, insight and offering their counsel. The best mentors are great listeners who understand your challenges and offer different strategies and ideas to not only help you overcome obstacles but excel at them. Mentors will often see something in you that you may not see yourself.
The average college freshman changes their major seven times. It's okay if you don't know what to be. But work on finding out what you want. Childhood was the time for well-rounded approaches, but as a young adult, you'll need to narrow your focus in order to achieve excellence. Getting by will not attract the right connections and opportunities you'll need to enter the job market.
Suicide rates are so high these days. Everyone is looking for ways to deal with this. I want to share with you a way to mentor millennials towards better mental health by learning a new way to connect, communicate and care.
Without question, having a mentor will enhance the effectiveness of our leadership skills immensely. This is especially true when the methods and management style of the mentor differ and contrast from our own. It is only when we challenge our conditioning by accepting new and different approaches to work and life that we truly grow.
If you are hiring summer students, have teenagers slouching around the house, or you are a forward-thinking CEO, you are spending some time thinking about Gen Z. The follow-on generation to the Millennials is something of an unknown to most. The biggest question: how they are going to perform in the workforce?
When it comes to women in tech, we know there needs to be a shift in attitude. Especially for females first entering and aiming to follow a progressive career path. While many emerging into the industry from technology programs worldwide, once in their field, there is still little advancement into upper management positions.
Coach passed away last Friday, having fought the good fight against cancer, the scourge of our times. You may not know Coach, but I hope you know someone like him -- a person who pours water on you when you are about to flame out, who picks you up by the scruff of your neck and puts you back on track, who shows you that there is indeed a big, wide world out there.
If you're a young woman just beginning her career, unfortunately there is no blueprint for success. No set of rules or guidelines to follow, no guarantee of "having it all." The truth is we all work at different companies and in different industries, report to different leaders, face different challenges and, most importantly, want different things.
At an increasingly vocal time to achieve gender equality in business, Mandy Rennehan is an inspiring leader to follow. Rennehan, 39, is the founder and CEO of Freshco, the first full-service, on-call retail maintenance provider in Canada and the Eastern United States, servicing clients like Apple, Nike and Restoration Hardware. Rennehan recently ranked 25 of 100 Canadian top female entrepreneurs.
For those of us who have founded companies, startups are like your first-born -- exciting, terrifying and usually there are only three of you! There is only one goal: survive. It's crisis management everyday and the strategy is "let's find something that works today."
One very telling trait in a prospective candidate's makeup is their ability to ascribe whatever success they may have had thus far in their careers to the influence or assistance of others. Often they will speak of a mentor or a series of mentors as pivotal figures. One very special mentor and teacher of mine is the Honourable Irwin Cotler.