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Mike Duffy

“This is the centrepiece for Canadian government.”
There’s a secret Ottawa Senators carving in the Senate.
Sen. John Wallace served for eight years.
3 senators accused of overstepping authority.
Mike Duffy won. Two and a half years after warning Canadians he "violated no laws" and "followed the rules," the senator from Prince Edward Island was vindicated Thursday when an Ontario court judge acquitted him of all 31 charges laid against him. What's more, Justice Charles Vaillancourt sided with Duffy. It was he, the Old Duff, not the Prime Minister's Office, the judge said, who had been the victim of a "mindboggling and shocking" series of events. Duffy's "free will" had been "overwhelmed" and he had "capitulated" as a result of the PMO's -- Prime Minister Stephen Harper's office, that is, -- "threatening efforts," the judge said.
They're putting their professional backgrounds to use at the Commons' heritage committee studying the state of local media in Canada.
Duffy's defence -- which I will refer to as "The Costanza" -- may become a standard courtroom tactic should his lawyers succeed. This new legal principle would hold that one is innocent unless the law, social behaviour and even etiquette are explicitly explained in advance in each case.
The senator flooded the court with small details Friday.
Shots fired.
To the world, Canada looks like heaven. What the world envisions when they think of Canada is not immigration detention centres or deportation. So, while the world mourns the loss of Abdullah Kurdi's family, we Canadians must ask ourselves, do we not have an obligation to live up to the global expectations we have created? Do we not have an obligation to rise to the occasion and create the asylum innocent families fleeing war-torn Syria, Iraq and other regions so desperately need?
Canada's public service has a proud history and has been recognized as world leader in terms of impartiality and offering great advice to ministers. Whichever party forms the next government, it is imperative that they take accountability seriously and create an environment of trust with the public service. Canada needs a creative, healthy and trusted public service and a government that holds themselves accountable.
The worse thing that interns -- and any other employees -- can do is to try and cover up the situation. For high achieving kids, admitting a significant mistake can be hard. We like their desire to be liked and their positive self esteem. But sometimes humility and confession go a long way. Which brings me to Stephen Harper and the Mike Duffy affair. Somehow in the political world, leaders and their staffs have come to believe that voters expect perfection. Any admission to the contrary is not tolerated. The result is the cover up.
To Canadians, Stephen Harper has been vague about what he did know about the plan to repay Senator Mike Duffy's Senate expenses and clear only about what he didn't know. Even with what Stephen Harper did know, the story keeps changing. The entire mess has become Canada's Watergate.
Only in Canada would paying money back to the government qualify as a scandal. But a scandal it is. It takes a special combination of incompetence and lack of ethics to convert a comparably innocuous act into a potentially fatal political scandal.
Says Harper's former top spokesperson: "To the people booing reporters: they're doing their job."
Nigel Wright was grilled by Duffy's lawyer, and revealed several interesting and significant details.
Things certainly changed between May and October of 2013.
Some very interesting testimony and more emails!
Wright, a wealthy man, delivered this tale with composure and sangfroid. In Nigel's world, writing a $90,000 cheque to a senator in need falls into the same category as taking young Conservative interns to lunch. Just one of those things one does for the less fortunate.