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missing and murdered aboriginal women

This conversation might be new to you, but it's always been relevant and ongoing, and it's often a reaction of something your people have caused. It's often complicated by outsider intrusion and historical erasure.
It has been a year since the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada released its final report, "Honouring the Truth, Reconciling the Future." It seemed like we finally had a government in Ottawa ready to listen and act. In the year since, we have seen the listening. Now we need to see the action.
The company says it was "a joke" between two drivers.
As pretty much the entire country watched The Tragically Hip live in Kingston, Ontario for their final show, Gord Downie used the opportunity to do something not many would...bring up First Nations issues to the prime minister himself.
We can vote, and drive, and march on Parliament Hill without fear. But do we question the deep rooted inequalities that make it possible for Aboriginal women and girls to disappear without a trace, and without an outcry? Do we demand an end to the gender wage gap that has been stuck at around 72 per cent -- and hasn't budged in years?
Children globally have remained the most vulnerable population and even though we have learned trauma will continue to happen, and happen again in various forms when it is not acknowledged or treated, we keep exposing kids to physical, mental, emotional and sexual violence.
There has been a historic allocation of funding at levels the previous government did not have the courage or desire to put forward. Monies have been directed to the inequality of education on reserves, to housing, to an Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Women and Girls, to Child Welfare, and a number of other critical areas.
"If I go missing and the [Winnipeg Police Service] has not changed the behaviours I have brought to your attention, I beg of you, do not treat me as the indigenous person I am proud to be."
An interview with Clive Weighill - Saskatoon Police Chief and President of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police: Some politicians talk about getting tough on crime. I'm saying you don't just want to get tough on crime, you have to get tough on the issues of poverty, poor housing, disadvantage. People are products of their environment, and if we can't solve those social issues, we're not going to solve the big picture in the end. I firmly believe that we have to work on poverty.
The warning explains that the website "deals with topics which may cause trauma to readers."
It keeps happening. Young, aboriginal women across Canada found dead or severely beaten. But for them, and the families of the 1,200 missing and murdered Indigenous women, this week's announcement of a federal government inquiry offers a rare moment to celebrate. I applaud the Liberal Government for finally recognizing that we, Indigenous women, are valued enough to make this a national issue. A lot of women have been working for many years around this issue.
Girls living in poverty across the developing world are also much more likely to be subjected to violence than their brothers. Many believe girls have no business being in school. Many are forced against their will into marriage and intercourse in their teens. Two out of three victims of child trafficking around the world are girls.
"No more are we going to be silent about the violence."
"This is not a First Nations problem. I think that some politicians like to say it's their problem not ours, but this a Canadian problem."
Haunting.
The protest gathered together several important causes.
Delores Brown disappeared on her way to visit her grandmother last month.
Now Sainte-Marie is back from biding her time in Hawaii — and devising an ingenious idea to solve the First Nations housing
The children of these women are almost forgotten. Our half-hearted national conversation on the ongoing racialized violence against stolen indigenous women barely acknowledges their existence. If there is even an estimate of the number of children affected, please let me know. And yet, the surviving children's loss is unimaginable. They lost mothers, sisters, aunts and cousins. You don't need to be a psychiatrist to understand that the grotesque violence aboriginal women suffer affects the mental integrity of the children they leave behind.
Cindy Gladue was found dead in an Alberta motel room in 2011. WARNING: This story contains very graphic details