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mmr

Measles is highly contagious.
Despite the success of vaccines, mumps wasn't eradicated. Small pockets of infection continued to appear. These small outbreaks were difficult to control but eventually burned out such that they disappeared. For the most part, these isolated events were considered part of the ongoing reality of an ever-present virus.
Effective.
Last month, the measles outbreak in California Disney parks sent parents into a flurry of panic. So far, 151 people from
Every day when I see patients in my surgical clinic, some are offered a procedure to help them feel better. Whether it is a minor surgery like a tonsillectomy, or something larger scale such as tumor resection, I have a full discussion with the patient regarding the benefits and risks of doing "something." Each time I go over the common minor risks of an intervention and the exceedingly rare, but potentially very serious risks that can occur. I also review with them the risks of doing "nothing" - of what may happen if they don't have surgery. Vaccination is no different.
It is easy to catch measles by inhaling the droplets or touching your face, mouth, nose or eyes after touching contaminated surfaces. So remember proper hand hygiene is critical to your protection of both measles but is also good practice to prevent common colds and other viruses.
Vaccine refusals are reaching epidemic proportions in many communities in the U.S., with large numbers of parents defying
Merck now faces federal charges of fraud from the whistleblowers, a vaccine competitor and doctors in New Jersey and New York. Merck could also need to defend itself in Congress: The staff of representative Bill Posey (R-Fla) -- a longstanding critic of the CDC interested in an alleged link between vaccines and autism -- is now reviewing some 1,000 documents that the CDC whistleblower turned over to them.
Vaccines as we know them are on the way out. On the way in are personalized, precision vaccines, created through a new discipline called vaccinomics that promises to protect a higher proportion of the population at far lower cost and without the real and potential harms that mass vaccination programs inflict on some people. Vaccinomics -- vaccinology informed by genomics -- turns the traditional vaccine model on its head by making the individual the starting point, rather than the end point, in the vaccine creation process. Vaccines work -- or don't -- on the basis of cumulative interactions in our bodies driven by a host of immune response genes and other factors.