HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

montreal massacre

How many women dare to publicly say that we won’t be patronized?
"I knew I had to fight. My rights and safety were not self-evident."
As we head into an election year, now is the time for political parties to commit to ending violence against women in their electoral platform.
While women have made leaps and bounds in the workforce since the Montreal Massacre, the spectrum of sexism remains pervasive
"We, too, want to defend lives," said Guy Morin.
Canada's Anti-Terrorism Act didn't come into existence until 2001.
A shooting attack at a Quebec City mosque is not the first of its kind.
Trump’s election win gives license to misogynists, Dr. Stanton said.
Twenty-six years on, what's changed?
You can know a statistic -- even be horrified by it -- but when those statistics become stories, and those stories are coming from women you've known, worked with, are related to or voted for and then the stories just keep coming -- the frame on the issue shifts.
Girls living in poverty across the developing world are also much more likely to be subjected to violence than their brothers. Many believe girls have no business being in school. Many are forced against their will into marriage and intercourse in their teens. Two out of three victims of child trafficking around the world are girls.
After Marc Lépine killed 14 women at Montreal's École Polytechnique, his actions fuelled a rejuvenated feminist movement
There are a growing number of people who spurn the words "feminism" and "feminist" even though they support women's rights and equality. It seems there's widespread misunderstanding about what these terms mean. And the message that sends to youth about the ideals of gender equality concerns us deeply
Twenty-five years ago I was a student at the Université de Montreal. It was December 6, 1989, and it was a cold, frigid Montreal day. At about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, I finished my last class before the mid-year exams. Normally I'd go to the library, study and head over to the main cafeteria, the one in the Polytechnique, for a bite to eat. But I didn't go to the library, and I didn't go to the cafeteria. I decided to go straight home. I had a big assignment to submit the next day and was determined to get it done. The next morning, the news of the murders shattered my orderly world.
What is less talked about when discussing Montreal Massacre, and as equally important, is the rights of women to choose a profession which is considered male dominated. The December 6 event had played an important role in women in STEM. As of today, the number of women in STEM fields is significantly lower than men.
On December 6, 1989 a 25-year-old man armed with a rifle and a hunting knife, killed 14 women studying at the technical college before turning the gun on himself. He said that his motives were to fight feminism. It's easy for us to sit back and pretend that women aren't being killed because of their sex nowadays. But the fact of the matter is, it continues to happen.
From left to right: Sonia Pelletier, Nathalie Croteau Currently there are about 2,000 female engineering students enrolled
As Canada remembers the 14 women killed in the Dec. 6, 1989 École Polytechnique massacre, one Canadian is honouring them
When the gunman, a rejected engineering student, shot those young women he was enraged that they were pursuing studies in a profession he believed was meant for men. That was a quarter of a century ago. Today, more and more women are flooding into professions, including engineering, once considered male preserves, but there is still so much more progress to be made in changing those attitudes that enable gender-based violence.
Born: 1961 Area of Study: Mechanical engineering Sonia Pelletier was killed just one day before she was set to receive her