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muslim brotherhood

When talk show host David Letterman asked news anchor Scott Pelley on June 27, 2012 what happened to the "Arab Spring," the latter replied: "It's almost as if the revolution never happened." This was what Omar Kamel, an advocate for social justice and civilian rule, feared the most.
Peace means something else in Islam and it behooves us to negotiate peace respecting their definition. If we are going to abide by the belief that all cultures are equal then we must accept the views of those with whom we negotiate a priori when we sit down to discuss and hazard peace.
I asked the caller whether he supported the Muslim Brotherhood and Hamas. He let out a menacing cackle. "Yes or no, Abdul. Do you support Hamas?", I pressed. "Yes, I do," he replied, prompting me to end the call. The fact is, I know nothing about this man. Is he a jihadi-in-training waiting to attack the West? Is he merely a Muslim Canadian with contempt for Canadian values?
During the short-lived rule of ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood complained bitterly about the "deep state" while liberal-secularists accused the Brotherhood of consolidating power throughout Egypt to push through its conservative social policies. In rebutting these claims, each side accused the other of sheer paranoia.
What stance do I take on Egypt? I can defend the killings and support the military, but my voice will change nothing on the ground. On the other hand, I can condemn the killings, guessing but not knowing, that of the 900 or more estimated dead so far, most were not armed, not terrorists, some not even Morsi supporters.
Wednesday, a few minutes after the Egyptian police attacked the Muslim Brotherhood sit-ins in Cairo, Islamists started targeting Christians (Copts) and churches in allover the country. Over 25 churches were burned down, and lots of shops and private property of Christians were robbed and destroyed. Among the burned ones was the Adventist Chapel in Assiut, the place where I attended kindergarten for around two years. My fear is that Egypt's Christians are going to face the same destiny as its Jews. Now, as Egypt may face a civil war after the July 3 coup, massacres against Christians will happen more,
But as we know that Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and in Canada don't really care about true democratic values. They are only interested in electoral process to gain the power in order to further their Islamist agenda not to exercise the right spirit of democracy.
There has been a lot of debate about the nature of Egypt's changing political landscape in the past few days -- did a coup remove President Mohamed Morsi or was the military acting on behalf of a massive popular uprising? But one thing almost everyone agrees on is how quickly the 85-year-old Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi lost favour with the people.
The grassroots Egyptian movement that marshalled millions into Tahrir Square will call this great amassment of people power a revolution. But when the dust settles and the euphoria of another night at Tahrir dissipates, I'm afraid people will wake up to the realization that they are effectively under a military regime.
Egyptians opposed to the Islamists should have endured the pain for the next three years and defeated Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood in the next election. As someone who has no love lost for the fascism of the Islamists, I too should be rejoicing the overthrow of Morsi, but I am not. Let me explain why. Egyptians have brought back the military, failing to understand a fundamental principle: if the generals can overthrow their opponents, they will do the same to the liberals whenever it suits them.
Liberal leader Justin Trudeau may be searching for "root causes," but some of us Muslims who are not blinded by a hate of the West know the root cause is Islamism -- political Islam -- that seeks to destroy the West and establish an Islamic supremacist caliphate.
In terms of the Arab Spring, Egypt is the most evolved nation. Syria is still mired in phase one; Libya is in phase three. But if the constitution is indeed accepted by the populace. Egypt will have made it to phase six -- it will have effectively completed its transition to democracy. Egypt presents the most significant storyline of the Arab Spring because it offers us the best view of what the future might look like in the Middle East. And what exactly is that?
Ransacking the Israeli embassy with the mobs looking on is good fun; moving anti-missile defenses and tanks into Sinai, contrary to the peace agreement with Israel, is a good promenade, but throwing the gloves down and mixing it up with the Israelis would be an insane and catastrophic error. A rematch now would not only be a mano-a-mano fought by Egypt with sullen and reluctant forces, defeat would mean the complete disappearance of that country as a contestant for Arab leadership.
Bachmann's reference to Hillary Clinton's deputy chief of staff, Huma Abedin, whose parents are said to have affiliations with organizations linked to the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood, has upset U.S. lawmakers. Michelle Bachman may not be America's brightest politician, but she and her colleagues are asking legitimate questions, which it seems, are making the Washington establishment very uncomfortable.
During Ramadan, a time for focus and introspection, Michelle Bachmann and her posse are testing me. Big time. She believes that members of the Muslim Brotherhood have infiltrated the U.S. government -- and she's calling them out in public. In today's ballooning and increasingly influential social media landscape, sure sticks and stones can break bones, but a correctly phrased Google search can be even more devastating.
The Prophet is reported to have stated that keeping good relations with people was better than praying, fasting or charity. Pakistani Muslims in the diaspora can wield much influence through their connections and networks. In the hallowed name of the Prophet, they must help rescue these Hindu girls not because it is politically expedient to do so, but simply based on the recognition that these girls are their own daughters and sisters.
Even after the Arab Spring, it is too early to tell what Egypt's fate will be. But if there's one thing to be said, it's that military intervention in the form of Ahmed Shafik winning the election might actually save the country. The other presidential option is the leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, a ruthless organization which supported the Nazis, and seeks to suppress democracy in the Middle East.
The leading promoter of Sharia banking in Canada, UM Financial Inc. has gone into receivership. The consequences of this bankruptcy may effect thousands of Muslim homeowners. The troubles at UM Financial did not come overnight
With Mr. Harper's decision to reintroduce controversial anti-terrorism measures, he has wrenched himself loose from the kind of self-imposed stymying that has characterized the Obama administration's ambiguous language -- and focus -- in Islamist counterterrorism.