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national drug plan

The lack of a national drug coverage plan is “a glaring gap in Canada’s social architecture,” but fixing the problem could
Calls for a national drug insurance program, commonly referred to as Pharmacare, can regularly be found in Canada's media. While access to prescription drugs is an important component of any well-functioning healthcare system, there's little evidence that an expanded government-run single-payer program is either necessary or ideal.
The dismantling of our emblematic health care system is happening beneath our very noses. We are assured that it is in or best interests, and that corporate, multi-tiered health care, like corporate globalization, is inevitable. Nothing could be further from the truth. Each promise about corporate healthcare is false. Comprehensive documentation shows that a "two tier" system is inferior to a universal publicly funded system, by any measure.
Universal pharmacare does not mean an "open bar" for everybody; it means leveraging buying power and using market forces in order to contain drug costs, achieve sustainability and improve the health outcomes of the population.
A conference was held a few weeks ago in Ottawa to discuss yet again the adoption of a pan-Canadian government-run drug insurance plan that would cover prescription drug costs for the entire population. Such a program would instead risk increasing the burden currently weighing down public finances. Such a plan would not only entail extra costs for taxpayers, but would do nothing to change governments' current propensity to restrict and delay access to new drugs. Foreign experience can teach us much about the dangers of adopting a monopolistic drug insurance system in Canada.