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Google News no longer operates in Spain because of a similar law, and in Australia, the scheme stands to benefit Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. while weakening others.
The Liberals' newly announced supports for media would have no impact on the day-to-day decisions of any working journalist.
A shooting in Annapolis, Maryland left five employees dead and two injured.
Our media may not be reading off identical scripts quite yet, but we'd be fooling ourselves to think there isn't a problem.
Most experts agreed that a medley of action is needed, both for funding the supply of, and improving the demand for, trusted news.
It seems an ideal time to consider the CBC's proposal to go ad-free, but with a slightly different approach.
What is needed is a call to action for our federal government to respond to this crisis.
On the other hand, if a publisher decides to close down a paper and have a news site on the internet, they should be eligible for support.
Support by the federal government of a shield law for journalists is certainly welcomed. Journalists, whose work is essential to a functioning democracy, need to be able to do their jobs without fear of facing prosecution.
The next time you read about mass layoffs or publications shutting down at the big media companies, don't be so quick to blame it on the Internet or millennials. Neither of them are going away, but if the big guys don't start doing something differently, they will.
To help ensure our incredible media outlets can survive through this time of upheaval as the ad-driven model for funding quality journalism falls apart, there needs to be some form of government support to assist those who need it. Longer term, we need the right mix of tax policy and regulatory support to encourage growth and strength in the media industry.
Thanks to the digital revolution, Canadians have access to more news and information than ever before. Public consumption of the news is at historic levels. Despite all that, and despite the capacity to reach more people than ever thought possible before, the economic underpinning for gathering and producing reliable news and information is quickly collapsing.
Why is it that there is more interest generated by fandom than there is by our country's economy? Why, as millennials, are we generally more interested in Hollywood and pop culture than we are about curating our own personal finances? Is it because our attention spans are too short to focus on the complexities of the world around us? Are we too easily bored?
Canada’s newspapers are in financial trouble, and that’s hardly news at this point. We’ve seen Postmedia, the country’s largest
The Internet is almost always part of the tragic narrative. It is killing print newspapers they scribe. Sad news is splashed across the headlines. The loss of the newspaper carrier who tosses your paper onto the front porch early in the morning does not equal the death of news and opinion. Even restructuring newsrooms does not necessarily mean less access to important information.
Media managers are wondering what went wrong. They are asking why journalism doesn't pay any more. If the solutions are hard to discern, they have only to look at the technology they so eagerly embrace. It's the digital technology. It has spread throughout many industries including journalism, like a virus.
At a time when our consumption of the news is at an all-time high, the very institutions at the heart of our news media are in crisis -- and demanding the attention of our political leaders. Postmedia combined newsrooms in Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver in a move that not only saw many talented and dedicated journalists pushed out the door, but also saw distinctive voices quieted.
There will likely be “few, if any” print newspapers in Canada by 2025, and local TV stations are at risk of disappearing
For the last 30 years or so, Canadians have repeatedly flagged healthcare as the most important national concern and the issue they want their political leaders to prioritize. Surveys and studies and polls and panels -- there have been plenty -- all come up with the same finding: Canadians care about healthcare.
MONTREAL - Transcontinental Inc. says it will end the publication of 20 weekly newspapers in Quebec, resulting in the layoff