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no fly list

The group has been working on a fix to Canada's no-fly list for years.
The RCMP feels that its voice and the voices of other law enforcement agencies aren't being heard in the government's public consultation on national security, which runs online until midnight PST December 15. Could something so weighted towards police powers have truly excluded the police?
As an 18-year-old on Canada's no-fly list, I've realized what it means to be an adult and adjust to the responsibilities that come with it, I also have to deal with many fears and anxieties that most other people around my age do not have to face like boarding a plane with my friends an having to deal with any issues that may leave me stranded in a country not my own.
It has now been five months since we started hearing and reading about the Canadian kids affected by additional security screening measures when they try to board a plane, and unfortunately, the situation hasn't improved much since.
It is now almost a pattern: every time we, as a human right organization or activist, write to government agencies inquiring about cases of Canadians detained abroad or of Canadians subject to abuse or possible discrimination, the governmental response will certainly contain somehow the issue of "privacy."
When it was announced last week with big fanfare during the visit of Prime Minister Trudeau to President Obama in Washington that both countries plan to create within 60 days, a Redress Working Group to help resolve the false positive cases generated by the "No-Fly" list, it was not an indication that both countries are revamping their huge information sharing system, but rather a proof that the sharing of information will continue ahead at a bigger scale and with more sophistication and with of course "some bumps" on the way.
Ill-conceived measures, like the no-fly list must be made smarter so they do not target the innocent. Otherwise, they have the ironic potential to actually erode our national security by alienating those they single out and stigmatize. But the way the no-fly list works, with a total lack of transparency and overwhelmingly targeting just one group -- Muslims -- feelings of alienation and powerlessness are exactly what the no-fly list is causing.
The government's appeal to national security should not exempt it from rigorous accountability and oversight. As many critics have argued, the system envisaged by the Passenger Protect Program and as amended by SATA has proven neither necessary nor effective. It is unconstitutional.
“How do you explain to a 6-year-old? What do you tell them? ‘Oh, I’m sorry you’re Muslim; I’m sorry you’re brown’?"
"He’s basically being carded for being Muslim.”
People whose names show up on No-Fly or Selectee Lists have no recourse in Canada. Air Canada could not remove my name from Federal No-Fly or Selectee Lists. My problems have been complicated with this latest Interpol incident -- illustrating the disregard this current government has shown in protecting the privacy of Canadian citizens.