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obesity

Skim milk may not be having the effect you expect.
Canada has toppled 151 countries in the wellness war, according to a new index.
In Traditional Chinese Medicine, red ginseng root has been used as a means to maintain health and possibly keep the pounds off
Plus-size model Tess Holliday is featured on Cosmopolitan U.K.'s October issue.
Instead of simply telling people to spend more time exercising, we can incorporate it into their everyday lives.
In human nutritional sciences, there seems to be a narrative for every diet, and for each diet, an army of believers.
This technique may one day improve our lives and potentially help us to correct and possibly cure diseases.
It seems (Health Canada's) 'consultation' is nothing more than a rubber stamp for public measures to protect us from ourselves.
All sorts of marketing to children is manipulative and unethical. The response should be straightforward: end all of it. Such prohibitions will not be without complications. There will be enforcement issues. But such complexities can be addressed. For the moment, let's get started. Let's send a strong message to corporate Canada.
There's little doubt white bread has become a symbol of poor health choices. For years, a war against the loaves has been waged in the hopes of convincing people to avoid intake. Canadians have been warned against even daring to eat this staple of Western life.
The diet industry will constantly tell us that we need to lose weight, sell us a cure that will fail, make us feel like the failures and then sell us something else. STOP! It's not just about losing weight, it's about gaining health, and that's not all about a number on the scale or the size of your jeans.
Why do we allow our young people to be continuously bombarded with the opposite of good eating messages and then expect them to grow up with healthy eating habits? It's time we added food and beverage advertising to the list of protections we afford our children and teenagers.
Contrary to what the Ontario Ministry of Health is saying, listing calories on menus will not make us healthier. In fact, it can actually make some of us sicker. Giving people partial information with which they're supposed to make informed decisions is just not going to work.
We can reasonably assume that most people are familiar with diet- and lifestyle-related recommendations, although they may not always turn those into action. But instead of neglecting your health needs because you are too busy or are having too much fun, you should lay the foundation for a long, healthy, and fulfilling life while you are in your prime.
Inactivity can cause all sorts of health problems for children.
It all started when the NWT finance minister suggested, in his last budget speech, that he would "investigate introducing a sugary drink tax" in 2018 to fight rising obesity and diabetes levels. Residents of the NWT already pay some the highest food costs in the country.
And it comes down to more than lifestyle factors.
And it is not just the after-hours routine that's disconcerting. Staying fixated on computers or smart phones practically all day long is commonplace for many. As a consequence, distracted eating has become the norm rather than the exception in many people's lives.
"Metabolic dysfunction" is a seemingly innocuous term that may sound unfamiliar to most of us. But medical researchers now believe it's a root cause of the global epidemics of obesity and Type 2 diabetes -- which are destined to kill more than half the world's population over the age of 50.
David Gething is relentless.