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online information

We're off to a great start! Just weeks after the launch of Canada's largest-ever pro-privacy Coalition, it seems the whole
These are worrying times for privacy in Canada. We've seen shocking revelations in recent months about the ways secretive Canadian government spy agencies like CSEC may be monitoring the everyday Internet usage of law-abiding Canadians -- and storing your private information in giant, unsecured databases.
Thousands of Canadians are speaking out to defend their privacy rights, after recent revelations that an ultra-secretive government agency is spying on our everyday online activities. This agency, the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), was revealed to be systematically collecting the private information of law-abiding citizens, including Canadians, from around the world. This is real.
We wouldn't let our children, our most important personal assets, drive around without a seat belt. But we still resist the idea that an appropriate amount of effort and investment is critical in securing our most important business asset, our information. To a hacker, your system password alone is as about as good as wrapping your data in a big red bow.
Whether con games are played in the digital world or the physical one, getting someone to lower their guard with a clever ruse makes the life of a thief that much easier. In the vernacular of hackers, this is called social engineering. Social engineering is about hacking the human mind, something that in many ways is significantly easier than finding a new software vulnerability and using it as a gateway into your enterprise. One way to get hold of that information is to target people according to their jobs and interests, and there is perhaps no greater source of data on those subjects than social networks.