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online safety

There are some very real risks, but also ways to share photos more safely.
Think through the values you have as a family and then consider how social media can be an extension or a reflection of these values.
Ransomware is effective because it often arrives via an infected email attachment, like a Microsoft Word or Excel document, appearing to be from someone you know. Once you open the attachment on a vulnerable computer, it starts to run and can lock the files on your computer and network server without your knowledge.
While the damage of WannaCry seems to have been limited by a "kill-switch" discovered by British computer expert, Marcus Hutchins, security experts warn that new versions of WannaCry could still proliferate. All of which begs the question: How can Canadian businesses protect themselves against falling victim to the next worldwide ransomware attack? Here are a few suggestions:
As a mom, I've seen my children share everything with friends, including passwords. Hyper-sharing is part of their lives, where privacy and digital barriers are not a concern. But from an outsider's perspective -- especially a parent's -- the risks are evident. I've seen firsthand how this hyper-sharing can cause trouble when friendships end. This is one of the things that moms need to worry about today that they did not 20 years ago - keeping their children cyber safe.
Let’s be real -- there’s nothing better than finding out a restaurant, café, or clothing store offers free Wi-Fi. Getting online quickly, easily and for free is a simple way to feel connected to our friends, coworkers, and our favourite brands. It’s the little things that make us feel valued.
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It's hard to imagine life without the Internet. Browsing the web has become so second nature to us that we share sensitive
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There are endless public awareness campaigns dedicated to cyberbullying. Change is happening. But with the focus on those discussions, children's privacy rights in Canada have been placed on the back burner.
Instead of enjoying the carefree innocence of childhood, many kids these days are fixated on how they look, comparing themselves to celebrities, models, and other unrealistic ideals. As parents, it's our responsibility to help our kids navigate the tricky landscape of body image with their self esteem and perspective intact.
Navigating safe online behaviour has become a huge concern for parents of kids today, as they try to find the balance between allowing their children to access online information for fun and for educational reasons, while protecting them from being taken advantage of by sexual predators and other online risks, from a very early age.