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Ontario Federation of Labour

The coffee chain is seeing serious fallout from franchisees' responses to Ontario's minimum wage hike.
By turning our backs on the PM, we were challenging a system built to inherently favour them above anyone else. As many social justice activists assert, the system isn't broken, it was built this way -- to disenfranchise and exclude women, "other" racialized people and anyone suggesting that change should be driven from the bottom up. What has occurred to me is that if white men are not leading the charge, they are often on the defensive.
In what many have criticized as a cynical and desperate election ploy, the Harper government is forcing Canadians to choose between safety and privacy. The trouble is that it is a false choice. Canadians must protect both.
As the Wynne Government prepares to release its next budget, voters are expecting to finally get a formal introduction to the Premier's plan for Ontario. But after years of public sector funding freezes, Ontarians are expecting more than just belt loosening: they want to see concrete investment in their collective future.
Nearly one in three people employed in Ontario is a union member. If you are one of these 1.6 million workers, you enjoy a tremendous advantage because your union has negotiated a fair wage and workday for you.
In all of the coverage of the Ontario election and the new Wynne government, the media has completely overlooked one of the most important stories of them all. What people don't realize is that the labour movement came together in an unprecedented way to defeat Progressive Conservative party leader Tim Hudak, and kept the U.S. anti-union movement out of Canada.
The brazen attempt to force employees to work for less is part of a broader trend of employers pushing two-tier agreements at the bargaining table. After seeing these kinds of agreements in place in the United States, employers across the Canadian manufacturing sector have been pressing younger workers to settle for lower wages and fewer benefits.
In Canada and Ontario we currently face many labour market challenges, including the rise of precarious work, growing numbers of migrant workers, cuts to employment insurance and cuts to job training programs for vulnerable workers. We hope the new Premier will situate Ontario as a leader among the provinces and territories and will address these challenges head-on.
Elevator workers are a silent army that keeps our province moving by ensuring that the 50,000 elevators in workplaces, apartments, hotels, hospitals and schools are running smoothly and safely. On May 1, 1,400 elevator maintenance workers were forced on strike by their employer, the National Elevator Escalator Association (NEEA). While these workers are off the job there is a significant safety concern for the public.
On April 25, 2013, renowned scientist Dr. David Suzuki attended the WFCU Centre to empower the crowd with his Wake Up Canada call. It's a campaign organized by the Canadian Youth Climate Coalition to support a day of action, encouraging kids to advocate for their environmental future through the very media that overlooked them this time around.