HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Ontario hydro

The Ontario PC leader has rejected comparisons to Donald Trump.
The budget we have tabled in the legislature is entirely about you. It's about your family, your hopes and your dreams. It's about the things that keep you up at night worrying. This budget is about making the choices that help you navigate the turbulence of a changing economy with greater security and more opportunity. And it's about setting your province on a course toward long-term success.
$1.4 billion per year would pay for 20,000 nurses in Ontario. It could save some of the 11 schools slated to close in Ottawa and dozens more around the province. It would go a long way to improving regional transit links. It could build hospitals, protect our water; the list goes on. This is what happens when politicians mess up the hydro file and become desperate to buy votes. You end up paying big time.
There is now officially a rap song for everything.
"I only have $65 left of my paycheque every two weeks to feed my family."
The premier may finally be able to recognize her mistakes with hydro rates, now that thousands of suffering Ontario families are screaming about it. But apparently, she isn't able to recognize the mistake she's currently in the process of making with cap and trade. Count that as a lesson not learned.
The Ontario Liberals should never have added the provincial portion of the HST to hydro bills in 2010, and a temporary rebate to bring down hydro bills is not the answer. Instead of continuing to manage our electric grid and economy based on the political fortunes of the corrupt Ontario Liberal Party, it is time for the government to get real about doing the right thing for a change.
Hydro rates are rising eight times faster than inflation.
For over 100 years, Ontario's public hydro system generated reliable electricity and got it to homes and businesses at a rate that people could afford. Today, our public hydro system continues to be a strategic asset that supports healthcare, education, and conservation (to name a few). If Kathleen Wynne goes ahead with her plan to privatize Hydro One, all of that could be in jeopardy, leaving Ontarians with higher hydro bills, but not much else. It is too valuable an asset to put on the auction block. I believe that hydro in Ontario should be affordable, reliable and should function as the backbone of our economy.