HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

organ donation

The Calgary MP’s earlier bill passed unanimously in the House but died in the Senate.
Nova Scotia passed similar legislation earlier this year.
But her parents hope she'll live on through organ donation.
The mystery of life after death continues. What happens when we "die"? This is one of the oldest questions of humankind, pondered
Around 250 people die each year waiting for an organ transplant.
Tyler Klassen signed up to be a donor just two days before a fatal car crash.
The bill is just a few short paragraphs.
The shift in the culture has meant that every department at Osler -- from the ER to the OR -- now see it as a priority that all families are given the opportunity to choose donation. Families can find hope in knowing that there is the potential to save eight lives through organ donation and up to 75 more through tissue donation.
Kidney disease is a serious condition that can affect anyone at any age, including children. Twelve children are on dialysis in B.C., almost 150 with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease and another 50 are in post-transplant care. These numbers may appear small but the impact on their lives is significant.
The public response to the appeal on behalf of Eugene Melnyk, owner of the Ottawa Senators hockey team, for a liver donor has been a heart-warming demonstration of the generosity of our community. Fortunately, a donor was found and the transplant was performed in time to save his life. But is it fair that he received a donation when many others are waiting, and dying, on the waitlist for a transplant? This is one of the common themes in the commentary in the news over the past few days.
Some call him a hero, but Imad Zammar says that if his mom, Freida Zammar, is present, she is quick to correct them and say, "he's not a hero -- he did what you are supposed to do -- for family." Maybe, but not everyone saves their older brother's life by giving him a kidney. And that is exactly what Zammar did.
Even though Sue Ellen Monaghan’s son is no longer alive, she can still listen to his heartbeat. The Portland. Ore., woman’s
There are 136 cases of measles in Quebec. The disease is spreading fast considering that this outbreak was allegedly caused by a single returnee from a Disney vacation where the outbreak started. Like a run away freight train, measles will jump person to person and eventually make it here. Is my son who had a heart transplant and can't be vaccinated protected? I sure hope so. If you don't want to vaccinate, don't. But when measles is out there, an airborne illness that is so easily spread, please keep your child home. Don't make choices for my child too.
Today, in Ontario, over 1,500 people are on the waiting list for a life-saving organ transplant. Yet, despite the apparent and overwhelming need for organs and tissues, Canada has one of the lowest rates of organ donation in the world.
A 14-year-old Vancouver Island girl with a rare liver cancer has made a video to encourage others to donate their organs
The chance to save lives is simple--become an organ donor. The chance that someone from a particular ethnic group will receive an organ, like Canada's aboriginal and South Asian populations, is a little more complicated. We're a diverse country, but does our donor pool match that diversity? In Ontario's predominantly caucasian communities, up to 50 per cent of residents are registered. But in more diverse areas like the GTA, the registration rate is around 14 per cent.
Rehtaeh Parsons will live on in the lives of others thanks to the organ donations made after her death. I received a letter from an organ recipient. This unnamed person found out this year they needed a new heart. Their family and friends were scared because they almost died. Then the words hit me, the recipient is "only 17 years old." Rehtaeh's age.
It's easy to say that you would help, but actually doing something becomes a bit more challenging. After a discussion with
When I was a toddler and was limping instead of walking, my parents began to suspect something was wrong. I went to numerous
No one can control what events will shape our world in any given time period. But collectively we can choose what stories we allow to shape our memory. That's why murderer Luka Magnotta was the wrong person for the Canadian Press to choose as Canada's 2012 Newsmaker of the Year.