HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

paid sick days

Over half of Canadian workers have no access to paid sick days.
There are too many Christmases where the shine was dulled by illness. Several times, Christmas Day got completely postponed, and everyone stayed home to avoid more cross-contamination! So, what you do to get through the next few weeks if an unplanned bug shows up to mess up your plans?
Every corporation in Ontario, whether public or private, that has a sick note policy is taking advantage of you, the taxpayer, by offloading the cost of their policy onto the health care system. You, dear taxpayer, are subsidizing the cost of their business. So, how does one change that?
There is some debate as to whether or not being sick at work does increase the chances for a small-scaled outbreak. After all, unless a person comes into contact with the bodily fluids of a sick person, the risk may seem remote at best. It's generally known as personal distancing of the two-metre rule.
Millions of workers across Ontario lack access to paid sick days and job protection. For many, taking a sick day is simply not an option. This gap in access to an important protection disproportionately affects people in low-wage jobs and precarious work, a sure signal about the unfairness of employment standards.
I often get asked whether one has to cover sick days for personal caregivers or nannies. I usually have the same response: it depends. What did you agree to when she first started working? This is a difficult topic, but it is important to think about it at the outset of the relationship.
It has been widely reported over the last few months that the Harper Conservatives want to attack the working conditions of public service workers by drastically weakening their sick leave provisions. In true Conservative "divide and conquer" fashion, they hope that this will pit unionized public service workers against the larger group of non-unionized workers in the private sector.
Government employees working for the province of Ontario took an average of 10.5 sick days in 2012. Compare that to just 5.8 sick days among people not working for the government in Ontario. Bankable sick days, virtually no limit on interchanging sick and vacation days, and massive abuse of a system designed to help those suffering with illnesses is shameful.
You wake with a case of the sniffles, achey bones and a scratchy throat on those crucial few days before a big project at