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parliament

Trudeau’s Liberals faced heat over Biden’s Keystone cancellation and Canada’s vaccine rollout.
How will this impact the WE investigation and COVID-19 responses like the CERB?
Canada's first virtual Parliament sitting was a wild ride.
The House of Commons Speaker wants MPs to avoid the temptation of sweatpants when working from home.
The Conservative leader wants "regular opportunities" to question Trudeau in the House.
Boris Johnson's decision to prorogue has left politicians crying foul.
The party nomination process is notoriously secretive. But should it be?
Populist sentiments were highest in the 1990s.
A conflict of interest inherent to Jody Wilson-Raybould's position fuelled the SNC-Lavalin scandal.
Transport Minister Marc Garneau called the efforts a "feel-good project for everybody."
Pictures and video posted to social media showed a heavy police presence across Westminster.
If you went from Ottawa to the other end of the famous Rideau Canal you'd end up in Kingston, Ontario. But before you get
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'O Canada' will be ringing through the crowds at least a couple of times throughout the day, but there will be plenty of
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Experience the pomp, pageantry and music of the Changing of the Guard at the Peacekeeping Monument, a one-time-only location
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Look for new episodes every other Tuesday.
Let's not stop at our elected officials. Let's start everywhere and encourage our political staff to be a part of the solution.
Are NDP supporters happy that their new leader may not seek a seat in Parliament?
One's mind goes back to arrogant Harper-era shenanigans such as the 'Fair' Elections Act. That was arrogance fuelled by the "we-know-better" attitude of the Harper regime, particularly in its later years. If one is not misreading its actions, there seems to be a similar degree of willful blindness in the moves of the Trudeau government.
While it might not be noticed at first glance, proper arguing has a moral component to it: One shouldn't convince people with tricks of language. This apparently wasn't a lesson learned by our prime minister during his university days. In fact, it's now quite obvious Mr. Trudeau thinks he's quite within his rights as prime minister to use fallacious reasoning to prop his decisions and policies in Parliament, and in front of the cameras. His emerging favourite? The "Goldilocks fallacy."