HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Parti Quebecois

English Canada should take the time to follow closely the upcoming Quebec election. It will matter for its future.
Having competitive tax policies that encourage wealthy individuals who own and run businesses to keep those businesses here - and keep paying taxes here - is good for all Quebecers. It helps grow the pie, and when the pie gets bigger, everyone can end up earning bigger and bigger slices.
It's too much to ask French citizens to explain how banning the burkini in any way diminishes security threats. If bans on religious attire that are so popular in France were indeed so constructive in the fight against terrorism why are the levels of anxiety continually on the rise in the country?
Rhetoric around PK ("privileged, "billionaire", "overwhelmingly pro-business") aside, it's hard to imagine a world in which he could have ever served as a beacon of Separatism. Perhaps M. Péladeau has come to this realization himself, though one can only wish a man well for a valiant (if misguided) effort in the face of an insurmountable challenge.
Over the past few decades, analysts have insisted that European style anti-immigrant politics were not easily exportable to either the United States or Canada as such ideas were unattractive to most North American voters. Anti-immigrant politicians usually appeal to a nation's ethnic majority population by insist that the dominant culture is being undermined by migrants. It's not simple to make this case in culturally pluralist democracies like the United States and Canada that lack an easily definable ethnic majority.
A Quebec Liberal candidate is blaming one of his volunteers for posting comments on Facebook suggesting he was a separatist.
Jacques Parizeau was Quebec Premier for merely 16 months, but he was a great servant of the state and, above all, one of the foremost builders of modern Quebec. He was one of the founding members of Parti québécois in 1968-1969, alongside Mr. Lévesque who had just stormed out of the Quebec Liberal Party. "Monsieur," as everyone called him, was a statesman; he truly had the interest of the public at heart in the noblest sense of the expression. The interest of the state came before his own. That is something that is becoming extremely rare in politics nowadays.
Jacques Parizeau was a passionate and principled man who believed in Quebec's independence, but he was at times a divisive politician. Judging by the many hateful comments I saw last night, his "money and the ethnic vote" speech after the razor-thin Quebec independence referendum loss in 1995 will continue to haunt his legacy. The over-the-top indignation I'm seeing from some is getting on my nerves. Is that one sentence from 20 years ago the only thing some of you can remember from his entire political legacy? Parizeau was so much more than just a rant, more than just one ugly moment in time.
Follow Us On Twitter ALSO ON HUFFPOST: The failure of the Scottish National Party (SNP) to secure victory in a referendum
Well, cross another one off the bucket list, as last Monday I made my debut as a TV political commentator. Given my career path and my reputation, the aforementioned gig seems strange and incongruous. But those who know me know my political passion, especially these days as Quebec and Montreal try to redefine their places in a rapidly-changing world.
But Pauline Marois lost the game to Philippe Couillard. By choosing to openly flaunt the card of an unwanted referendum and sovereign Quebec, she is caught in her own trap. And by inadvertently bringing to light the aspect of her privileged profile, she has fallen out among the province's populace.
Please let Quebec choose a government that will represent values of inclusion, acceptance, and freedom. Let Quebec be a province where we can raise our children not only to respect, but to honour diversity. Let Quebec be more like my daughter's school -- a place where we can thrive and become better people.
When Pauline Marois dissolved her minority government of only 18 months and launched a new election campaign in Quebec just
As citizens of the "free world" -- North Americans, at least -- we have a great power bestowed upon us: the right to vote. Yet this basic right is often taken for granted. Understandably, enacting one's support for politicians can be frustrating, but fundamentally they are chosen by us to manage our tax dollars. And listen up: you pay taxes.
Marois seemed panicky in attacking Couillard Tuesday at a press conference in Verdun, and in a seemingly desperate attempt, brought up Arthur Porter and Couillard's apparent close connection. The PQ is apparently planning on phasing Marois out of their election strategy, by replacing her with the more popular Bernard Drainville and his baby; la charte.
Recently, a former Quebec journalist argued that Canada's mainstream broadcasters were hypocritical for seeming to lend a sympathetic ear to those opposing the proposed Charter of Values. "Not a kippa, hijab, cross or turban in sight. Religious symbols are, quite simply, not part of the TV news uniform; never have been," wrote Micheal Dean in the Globe and Mail. And while he's right in that there are few Canadian journalists sporting symbols of their faith, the premise for his argument needs to be turned on its head. Rather than justify the Parti Québécois's bid to limit freedom of religion in its public institutions, the media's lack of representation of diverse communities must be called out for what it is: a letdown for democracy.
Dear Quebeckers: I'm not a political commentator. I don't even play one on TV. Instead, I'm an average Canadian citizen and
For the naysayers or eye-rollers out there, there is nothing wrong with removing my hijab or other article of clothing for a doctor if it is necessary for the sake of the medical examination. In this instance, it was not. It was the equivalent of asking a woman to fully remove her top and undergarment in order to examine her lungs. The changes in the environment in Quebec are subtle but ever present. I have felt the chill in the air. From the racial slur while at the movies with my kids to reading passive aggressive comments on social media. Our joie de vivre, pride in diversity and bilingualism has been replaced with political unease, targeted discrimination of visibly religious minorities and linguistic force.
OTTAWA — When Prime Minister Stephen Harper's government throws stones at the NDP for having members who supported separatist
They want to control what you wear. Yes, I'm talking about the Quebec Charter of Values. It will allow the state to tell you what you can and cannot wear as well as what you can and cannot say. As one Prince Arthur Herald editorial also described, it won't only affect people who are religious.