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patriarchy

The 38-year-old's life has been in her father's control since 2008.
Once you notice how many parts of our culture normalize rape, you'll start seeing it everywhere.
Oftentimes it's a lot more subtle.
Is one a sign of greater emancipation and one a sign of greater oppression? Is it outrageous to ask the question?
"I definitely can remember being called a squaw and a man assuming that he had access to me, to my body, to my hair."
Concerns have been recently raised about the Muslim Toronto police chaplain on his personal views about women and marriage. Officer Musleh Khan's viewpoints come across as strongly patriarchal and infantalizing of women.
"I think there’s not one solution, there’s multiple, multiple solutions that can be pursued at the same time."
As of 2014, 143 out of 195 countries legally guarantee equality between men and women. I wish I could say that gender equality, or any equality, enforced by the law translates into equality in the minds of people. Deeply rooted problems preventing true parity have been promoted by patriarchy for years, passed on from one generation to another disguised as 'tradition.'
n the past decade, Indonesia has progressed in terms of female labour force participation. However, only 51 per cent of Indonesian women are currently engaged in the labour force. This is due to several barriers, including the fact that women are tied to culture, traditions, beliefs and customs.
To some people, this may not be particularly mind-boggling. Women have moved up a lot in the world in terms of social, economic, and political influence. It wasn't so long ago that women were expected to adhere to the barefoot and pregnant "laws" that were governed by the patriarchal political climate. But here we are, 2015, and cheering wildly because we have more women in government. Apologies for raining on the parade, but I have to question this. In a truly gender equal society, we would all look at this cabinet and say, "Huh."
Let's remind ourselves that inaccessible abortion services do not eliminate abortions. The choice, or even necessity to terminate a pregnancy is a reality. Criminalizing abortion can lead to unsafe and potentially life-threatening options for many women in disadvantaged situations.
A man killed six people in a drive by shooting on Friday night in California. On Thursday night the apparent shooter made a video explaining why he was going to embark on the murderous rampage. In this video the man stated that he was a 22-year-old virgin who couldn't attract women. We should avoid reducing the murderer to a crazed individual whose actions can be explained solely by his mental state. Instead, we should analyze how the misogynistic societies we live in enabled the murderer's killing spree.
The patriarchy has suffered a few punches lately, at least in Toronto this year. But I think it's safe to say that the patriarchy is doing just fine, thank you very much. There's still a lot of work to be done to even the playing field in the business and political world.
If David Gilmour is indeed refusing to teach literature by women, queer, Chinese, and Canadian authors, then he is actively excluding them from the history that he imparts to his students. My fear for the future is that students are being denied the opportunity to learn from, be inspired by, and empathize with literature that doesn't fall under the white-hetero-male domain.
Last month, I wrote how patriarchy and racism give birth to rape culture, not a drunk woman or her miniskirt. But it is baffling to see the dialogue outside of these platforms going off on a tangent, in random directions. This needs to stop, now. Here are five "solutions" that aren't stopping rape culture.
A 19-year-old woman, named Amina Tyler, who lives in Tunisia, was threatened with stoning after she exposed her breasts in a photo she posted online, scribbling the words -- "my body belongs to me, and is not the source of anyone's honour" -- on her torso in Arabic.
A decade of feminism couldn't explain why the Married Man spooked me and how let down I felt by my female co-workers who excused his behaviour. Why were we divided? Most of all, I was disillusioned with myself; if I couldn't hold my own against the Married Man and sway my co-workers to side with me, what right did I have to call myself a feminist?
Men may take women out on different sorts of dates than they previously did, but the expectation that men be the ones to do this largely remains. When it comes to dating, many men are expected to pay for dates, both by some women, and more commonly, by themselves. Men paying for women on dates because they enjoy their company, and view it as a kind gesture, is not an issue. The issue is that some men still pay for women simply because they are women, and the men would feel emasculated if they did not.
Regrettably, many third-wave feminists support a woman's right to wear the burka. Women in fact cannot make choices freely when control over their lives is as invasive as it is within the conservative Muslim community.