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Paul Martin

We should aspire to create an economy that includes and benefits everybody, especially those excluded for so long.
Since announcing this proposal former Ms. Leitch's opposing leadership candidates, interim Conservative Party leader Rona Ambrose and former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney have all condemned the policy. If we subscribe to Trudeau Sr's idea that there is no such thing as a model Canadian, that a society that emphasizes uniformity creates intolerance and hate how can we classify anything as "anti-Canadian"?
"The problem is the gross underfunding by the federal government."
It seemed like everyone in Ottawa knew Mike Robinson far better than I did. And yet, like everyone else, I had been touched by his healthy and warm personality in ways that were unusual in that city. His greatest gift to us all, important or, like me, less so, is the sense of goodness and fairness he left us in a world where cut and thrust are essential tools of the trade. He was good in every way that we could possibly imagine that word.
"They should leave the reserves without a decent education?"
June 6 is the date on which the ban on medical assistance in dying will be formally lifted in Canada.
Here's the thing: social change is not an easy process. It takes effort, stubbornness and the ability to persevere in spite of all obstacles and opposition. Once achieved, social change and any newfound rights and freedoms should never be taken for granted, yet they often are.
Caught up in its contradictions, the NDP hopes nobody will notice. There is the Sherbrooke Declaration NDP, which promises a condition-free right to opt out for the Government of Quebec. And then there is the centralist NDP, which unilaterally sets its childcare plan according to a rigid model incompatible with the contemporary practice of Canadian federalism.
Canada does not follow the U.S. in spending astronomical amounts of funds to develop and purchase weapons and use them in wars. Our health care expense is way lower than that of the U.S. The U.S. spends about 17 per cent of its GDP on health care, whereas the Canada medical share is around 11 per cent. So where has the Canadian government's money gone?
To put it in a local context: the B.C. government is providing unprecedented tax breaks to what is effectively a foreign Crown corporation, where the prime minister is suspected of siphoning off US$700 million from one of its other Crown corporations to his personal bank accounts. Doesn't inspire confidence.
"A strong and dominant national feeling is not a luxury in Canada, it is a necessity."
Despite these negative views on the Dalai Lama coming from a more assertive China (now reportedly the world's largest economy and our second largest trading partner) Canada has provided considerable support to the Dalai Lama and issues of concern to him.
Ontario lives in the political radical middle and is more moderate -- in principle, ideas and people -- than assumed. Kathleen Wynne understood that more than either the PCs under Hudak or the ONDP under Horwath.
If Canadians knew the truth about the dismal on-reserve education systems, they’d fight for equality. Paul Martin is convinced
Wait a minute. Aren't we forgetting someone? Three of Stephen Harper's predecessors — Brian Mulroney, Jean Chretien and Kim
Former prime minister Paul Martin blasted Stephen Harper's First Nations policies at the Liberal leadership mini-convention
Left-wing fundamentalist ideology is oppressing the very groups they claim to champion. Their rhetoric is anathema to the needs of those they claim to represent. The ideologues on the left are the ones who need to take responsibility for the poor outcomes for the aboriginal peoples.
In the years since the departure of Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, the Liberal Party of Canada has been trapped in a political Groundhog Day. Three times across a decade, the party has risen at what it expected to be the dawn of its charismatic leader. A similar destiny might seem improbable for the young Trudeau, but he'll very soon have gone as far under the steam of his famous name as that fuel can deliver him.
Another week, another "will he or won't he" media look at Bob Rae and the Liberal Party. It has yet to sink in to for some Liberals that the leadership is a poisoned chalice and the "brand" is profoundly damaged and must be substantively redefined.
Canadians often grumble about their politicians. We are quick to blame Ottawa, and sometimes rightly so. But in the commitment of people like Sheila Copps, we should also remember that we are also very lucky. Political life is hard; the dedication of people like Copps is important.