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philanthropy

Hint: she's also the one dragging Taylor Swift on Instagram.
Do we want to only wait to give when there is a big problem? It's time to take a look in the mirror and ask ourselves what kind of Canada we want to be.
This discrepancy between HIV/AIDS treatment and LGBTQ rights is a continued battle, and hope lies in education and acceptance. Without eradicating the stigma surrounding LGBTQ citizens, the world's most vulnerable populations will have little hope of eradicating HIV/AIDS on a global scale.
Let's all think about why and how Canadians can be encouraged to give their time, talent or treasure for the common good, and then find ways to put our ideas into action. And let's challenge ourselves to become an even more caring nation.
It seems like a no brainer. Supporting charitable organizations and doing acts of kindness is the right thing to do. Most people get that. My family and many Canadians are very privileged. I feel we have an obligation to give back, to "pay it forward."
We are presented opportunities everyday to make a difference in the lives of those around us, near or far, through our actions, time, or money. Whether we embrace that opportunity is up to us and, evidently, even the smallest of gestures or actions can veritably snowball into lasting results.
The statistics are horrendous and unacceptable. Less than 40 per cent of indigenous students who start grade one will graduate from high school. Compare that to the national rate of 87 per cent. The gap in university graduation is even greater. The economic advantages of "closing the gap" far outweigh the costs.
My mother-in-law Sharyn Mandel was a fierce and fiery force in this world. A passionate educator, her life's purpose was teaching. She had a particular interest in developing the minds of young girls, and fostering their independent spirits. Upon her passing, we discovered that she intended for us to make her often-talked-about dream of founding a school in a developing country a reality.
The reality is, we face major labour shortages in trades in Canada. Between 2014 and 2020, we can expect 219,000 construction industry employees to retire. And in cases like Fort McMurray, the wildfires both decimate local economy and create a huge need for skilled trades to help rebuild the community.
It's been recognized that millennials hunger for meaning and purpose in work and want to make a difference in the world. So businesses need to find solutions to engaging their millennial talent, and one very powerful way to do that is through social enterprise campaigns.