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professional development

If no one has talked to you, book a meeting with your supervisor.
Employers should be actively taking steps to make all staff, no matter how long their agreement is, feel included, welcomed and heard.
Studies demonstrate the average business professional spends approximately 90% of their time writing and reading business email. I've seen first-hand that learning to write better emails helps participants get more done in less time, and it helps organizations and individuals improve their reputation.
Helping your employees motivate themselves is easier than you might think, and it starts by helping them feel good about the work they do. A powerful approach I teach in my Leadership Training or Executive Coaching is called Intrinsic Motivation. At a high level, Intrinsic Motivation is about helping employees feel one (or all) of the following 4 things.
The availability of these instant solutions have shifted not just our lifestyles, but our very decision making processes. With all of the luxuries and conveniences on-demand tools provide, they can be an unhealthy pairing when it comes to food.
Whether you're using PowerPoint, Prezi, Sway or Keynote, the winning formula contains visuals that support your spoken content. Well-produced visuals add impact, guide the story along, and deliver that story in a concise and captivating way.
Rather than focusing on your anger, focus on hearing what the other person is saying. Don't listen to what they are saying -- hearing and listening are two totally different things. Hear past the person's words, and try to understand what they are trying to tell you.
Before you walk through the door, however, create a target for how many new connections you plan to make. Perhaps push yourself to meet 10 new contacts, or exchange 20 business cards. Are you hesitant to approach someone you do not know? Consider asking questions to break the ice.
In the spring of 1985, John Fogerty had a hit song called "Centrefield". While you may not be familiar with the song itself
There is a time and place for everything, and the things you might share with your friends or personal network are not always appropriate when you're on the job. After all, you never know how people might react to something you share (or overshare) at work, and those reactions can affect your day-to-day relationships and your career as a whole.