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Quebec language

Speaking on a cellphone in English got ugly fast for a Verdun woman.
In the aftermath of the publication of my most recent editorial -- "Let Them Learn French": Canada's Bilingual Elite Hold All the Power" -- I've been widely denounced by all manner of pundit, much of Quebec, and even our old pal Gilles Duceppe. On the other hand, I've also heard from numerous Canadians applauding me for finally confronting one of this country's most sacred taboos head-on.
The PQ should focus on using education to preserve its culture and language. Almost 80 per cent of Quebecers identify themselves as Francophone. Thus, it's a failure of education when someone who was born, raised and educated in Montreal tells you that he moved to Toronto because it's impossible to find a job in Montreal. The issue should not be that French was required of them but that, over the course of their educational career, they were not properly taught the language and its value -- economic and cultural. The new Ontarians will not phrase it this way, of course.
We live in a province where language is a huge issue. I can't even begin to tell you how many times people have said to me "Oh your son doesn't speak French?! Do you realize you live in Quebec"? Really, thank you kindly for pointing that out. Do YOU realize my son is autistic and for the first five years of his life barely spoke?
A teenage Quebec entrepreneur has a few choice words for the government after being told his company’s name is too English
The Language Police are at it again – and this time, they’re going ‘under the cover.’ In the YouTube comedy that follows
It's the not-too-distant future and Sgts. LaJoie and Bourgignon are patrolling the mean streets of Montreal. Their first
My ancestors were among those who discovered La Nouvelle France; "Drouin" was my paternal grandmother's last name. I love Québec and I stand up for it. I wish I could say that my petit nation thought I was the ideal Québecois. But no, I feel like Madame Marois wants to turpentine the Anglo off of me or have the French Québecois alienate and exile me. There are many of us Québecois who are not pure laine, but Québec is the only place that is home to us. If people of all religions, of all races, of both genders can live together in harmony in this province, why can't Anglos and Francos?