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Ralph Goodale public safety

A 2017 survey dealing with pay ranked the RCMP 72nd out of 82 police services in Canada. Pay discrepancies are having a huge impact on both morale and recruiting. But compensation isn't the only problem plaguing the RCMP. Long back up times are a huge health and safety issue.
Numerous concerns have been raised regarding the broad powers that will be granted to preclearance officers under the preclearance bill. Critics of the preclearance bill say that it goes too far and that Canada has given up too much of its sovereignty.
When it comes to countering radicalization, Canadian policy has a different problem. While the U.S. is pursuing a response to radicalization which actually feeds the problem it is supposed to be addressing, the Canadian response of late has been to effectively deny the reality of the conflict that we are in.
The case of three Canadian citizens: Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad El Maati and Muayyed Nureddin, resurfaced this week in the media bringing back the dark side of Canadian complicity with regimes that routinely use torture and forced disappearance in their so-called "war on terror."
Ralph Goodale described the country's national terrorism threat level as "medium."
With additional extraordinary powers granted to CSIS since the passing of Bill C51, one only can wonder whether these visits are becoming the norm rather than the exceptions. The disruption powers included in Bill C-51 allow CSIS to seize documents or computers, enter people's properties, spy on them without a judicial warrant.
Last federal budget, the government announced the plan to create a counter terrorism office. This new initiative named as the Office of the Community Outreach and Counter-radicalization Co-ordinator would cost Canadian taxpayers $35 millions dollars. With an initial funding of $3 million in 2016-2017 and a $10 million a year in the subsequent years.
Immediately, after the Brussels attacks, an engineering student from the University of Waterloo was arrested by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Even if the Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale went out publicly and declared that Canada isn't under any additional or specific terrorist threats, the RCMP decided to choose to arrest the suspect during a time of fear.
"He’s basically being carded for being Muslim.”