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Reality Television

What's more instructive than privileged white women making mistakes?
Brooke Lynn Hytes was the first Canadian to compete on the reality competition show.
There are those who argue that reality shows are an affront to culture, but if it is something that is enjoyable and brings people together, I would argue it is not something we should feel guilty about. In today's divided world we should be looking for more things to unite people, which is why reality TV should be brought into the open.
As digital natives, our adaptability to change is far superior than generations past. We swiftly adapt from VHS to DVDs and record players to cassettes to CDs and MP3s. We know what a floppy disk is yet can operate our digital lifestyle almost exclusively on Cloud. Our potential is limitless and our ambition is uncapped. We are pretty brilliant.
Young adult author Heather Demetrios is no stranger to YA readers or social media, and her newest idea combines the two. Launched this week, The Lexie Project follows Lexie Baker -- a character from her book Something Real -- as she travels to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career.
The general feeling is mean-spirited now. It's sneering and snide. Crass insults from people taking very little risk who now mock people who are risking it all. What was once about dreamers with big ideas looking for a little help in the right direction has just become a parade of bankers, asking what's in it for them and then rolling their eyes at anything that isn't a surefire hit.
I continue to be struck by the phrase "Reality Television." I mean, give me a break. In the day and age of Photoshop, voice-overs, and numerous editing tools, who can seriously believe that anything on TV is real?
I can just about handle a giant trophy fish tacked onto a wall, but the abundance of cowhide rugs under coffee tables makes me queasy and I am positively pukey when I see a set of goat antlers resting on a side table or used as book ends.
A somewhat awkward, bespectacled Chinese man by the name of Xiao Wang wandered onto the stage of Holland's Got Talent. The PhD student announced he would perform a rendition of "La donna è mobile" from Verdi's Rigoletto. And that's when Judge Cornelis Willem Heuckeroth, who goes by the nickname Gordon, cracked his first joke: "Which number are you singing? Number 39 with rice?"
Why in this day and age do we still form quickly arrived at, negative first impressions about people? And why do we so undeniably feed into stereotypical patterns of labelling people based on appearance, confidence levels, fashion sense and charisma, among other equally irrelevant character traits?
What does it take to become an Iron Chef? "It's always about getting creative and trusting yourself more in the kitchen," says
Maybe some people like to feel superior by laughing at the characters on these shows, but by choosing to waste their time on such drivel, they inadvertently demonstrate their own lack of discernment.
The over-the-top squabbles and intense drama of the 'Real Housewives' franchise are coming to Canada -- more specifically