HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

squamish

My hometown wasn't a particularly tolerant place when I grew up there. Squamish in the 1990s was a logging town of roughly ten thousand people, often referred to as the "McDonald's pit stop on the way to Whistler." Despite being less than an hour away from a diverse and progressive urban center, many of the kids I grew up with didn't have access to experiences that might expand a young person's view of the world. And many of the ones who did seemingly weren't interested.
The district of Squamish in British Columbia is widely known as the Outdoor Recreation Capital of Canada. But this all-season destination for climbers, hikers, mountain bikers, kite surfers, and birdwatchers is also developing a reputation as a nucleus for clean innovation.
Since I've moved to Vancouver in February of last year I've become accustomed to daily news updates on the real estate market. There are other towns like Squamish that are on the winning end of the housing crisis in Vancouver -- these towns are getting young families that will one day help their town prosper.
We shouldn't be judging a political leader on what he or she has been saying or doing a few weeks before an election. Assessment needs to be based on the prior years. In Mr. Trudeau's case, even putting aside the question of what we should expect to see in someone with such a privileged upbringing, a quick review of the past couple years is evidence enough.
Cocktails on the beach are nice but, at times, we prefer a more active holiday -- something that beautiful Squamish, B.C., delivers in spades. With our gear securely loaded into our Chevy Colorado, we recently made the one-hour drive from Vancouver to Canada's outdoor adventure capital for some serious physical fun.
No injuries have been reported.
"It’s pretty smelly, pretty toxic smelling."
You in?
The former professional stunt double for Arnold Schwarzenegger committed to the fiery stunt if voter turnout improved.
Public transit doesn't exactly bring the adrenaline rush that mountain biking does, yet a new commercial from BC Transit
A SUV carrying a family of five on a B.C. highway went over a steep embankment in heavy snow, killing a seven-year-old boy
The current Burnaby Mountain demonstrations and civil disobedience over Kinder Morgan's proposed pipeline expansion has developed into a perfect storm of activism. You have three powerful First Nations; you have location, your local politicians, academics, the young, the old, and David Suzuki and his grandson.
The Woodfibre LNG issue in Squamish holds vast importance for the broader community, the province, the country, even the world at large. It's that big.
OK, OK, we don't exactly need another reminder of the beauty of the Greater Vancouver region, but sometimes a photo comes
Like it or not, it's time for Squamish to grow a pair and get political. Stop, even for a few hours, the trail bike riding. The hiking. The mountain climbing. The kite boarding. If the mudders really want to "live the life," then it's time to really get dirty. But by putting a little time aside for arguing and debating for the environment you so immensely enjoy.
Enbridge is expected to be a significant issue in this fall's municipal election campaign in Kitimat, just as Woodfibre LNG is expected to be in Squamish.
Given all the impacts and uncertainties, he added, "Maybe one of the best things you can do in British Columbia is kee this resource in the ground."
The next election is in 2017. You suspect that voters might want to see a little something for all the hype before then, so what to do? Well, take one of the proposed projects and slam the pedal to the metal. And by all accounts, that project is the proposed Woodfibre LNG plant in Squamish.
The event, located about an hour north of Vancouver in Squamish, B.C., brought over 100,000 fans together. And while there were definitely a lot of people overdoing it with substances, the festival was able to remind me why we go to these things in the first place: the music.
With the curtains slowly opening around politicians and corporate owners, the sordid, unholy bedfellow goings-on would make Ron Jeremy blush. (Cover your eyes now children and those pure of heart.)