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stephane dion

We know why the Liberals won't fix this bill: for them, the economic benefits of selling weapons to countries like Saudi Arabia outweigh human rights.
The federal government has important national functions to fulfill. It would be better able to fulfill them if it stopped trying to solve every problem in the country, especially by violating our Constitution and intruding on provincial jurisdictions.
If there is anyone to blame, it is -- and can only be -- the governments implicated in this internationalized conflict. Those who support the armed groups, both militarily and logistically, and those who oppose the international justice system investigating the atrocities and crimes perpetrated in this conflict are all to blame.
I hope Canada's new government is looking for partners in the continent and not a Santa Claus role in an ever-changing continent that is in need of new and bold leadership. I hope the principles of trade will triumph the handouts of the past, in a continent that is super-rich but poorly managed.
Foreign affairs minister lauds actions government has taken.
Trudeau throws dig at his predecessor.
Ex-Grit leader called for 'bold leadership' 8 years ago.
He was shuffled out of his position leading a cabinet climate change committee.
The minister declined an invite from the electoral reform committee.
The Liberals are hoping Canada will win a Security Council seat in 2021.
Ambrose urged Trudeau to listen to his minister.
The minister says he raised human rights issues behind closed doors.
Cancelling a Saudi arms deal had virtually no measurable impact on Sweden's economy.
The Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister, Stéphane Dion, recently declared that Canada "should join this important protocol" -- the United Nations' Protocol against Torture. More than a decade after it was initially passed, Canada is still sitting on the bench and watching cases after cases of torture happening.
"Responsible conviction" is a strange combination of words that summarizes the guiding principle that the new Foreign Affairs Minister Stéphane Dion is proposing to follow in order to fulfill his mandate. However, Mr. Dion didn't say a word on how the "responsible conviction" can help cases of Canadians detained abroad.
But Conservatives say their bid to condemn the so-called BDS movement isn't partisan.
Re-engaging Tehran does not mean that Canada and Iran will become strategic partners, however, if Canada can engage with Saudi Arabia, a country with which little is shared in terms of values, then surely it can engage with Iran whose population is highly secular and Western-leaning.
No line taken by the government in this matter will please everyone. Perhaps it will plough through with the deal and weather the heat from critics, no matter how persistent. Alternatively, if it decides to open the books on the Saudi deal, and the contract is altered, suspended or cancelled, there will be complaints from those concerned for the economy. The Saudi arms deal presents the new government with an admittedly complex policy challenge. But challenges can result in opportunity.
And Conservatives aren't happy.
On the same week that Ottawa condemned the most recent human rights violation in Saudi Arabia, it confirmed that Canada was set to proceed with plans to arm the perpetrator. Every indication is that the $15-billion deal, which the Canadian Government brokered on behalf of General Dynamics Land Systems of London, Ontario to provide Saudi Arabia with Light Armoured Vehicles, will go ahead. But can this largest-ever Canadian military exports contract comply with the human rights safeguards of Canadian exports control policies?