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Steubenville

Yesterday, news broke that the FBI raided the home of Deric Lostutter in April. Deric is most famously known as KYAnonymous, the Anonymous operative who leaked a video where the young men who were later convicted of raping an unconscious teenager girl in Steubenville, Ohio were bragging about what they did in a disgustingly proud manner.
We're still left with the question of why the RCMP failed Rehtaeh Parsons, the 17-year-old who recently commit suicide after being allegedly raped and bullied. Something seems seriously amiss when photographic evidence of a rape is considered not useful, especially when the investigating officers tell the victim and their family they believe the rape happened. We can discuss cyber-bullying all we want, but perhaps it would have lessened, or even stopped, had the boys who raped, and ultimately were the cause of her social torture, were arrested. We don't have systems in place to stop cyber-bullying yet, but we do have institutions to bring justice to those who commit crimes. Especially when it comes to a rape that happens in real life
We lose sight of the fact that the evil exists on a continuum and if we don't pay attention, we slide, individually and collectively, into evil, selfish actions; exchanging one set of morals for another; Like Steubenville. A mob; a crowd; choosing not to intervene because of an absence of an internalized morality.
The real horror of Amiel's column is not that she wrote it, or even that it was published in a mainstream magazine. It's that she is merely putting to paper what is thought by so many. There are people who believe that intoxication, even unconsciousness, means yes.
The fact that my first incidence of being sexualized was when I was four tells us something about our society. In my case, I've been lucky to be raised by staunch feminists, but even with my dad and mom's messages of "YOU DO YOU, GIRL," I was still smothered by the rape culture that dictates our social values.Rape culture pits us against each other. But the thing is, some of the most outspoken and disgusted people about the Steubenville trial have been men I look up to and men I am friends with. The women? Well, we're tough broads -- we have to be.
As I read the reports, it is hard not to remember what it was like when I was in high school. I grew up in a typical small prairie town with good, honest hard-working people. Yet I'm sure that if we're being honest with ourselves, most of us know that what happened in Steubenville could have easily happened where we lived, in any city or town.
You need to stop using the "wives, sisters, daughters" argument when you are talking to people defending the Steubenville rapists. Or any rapists. Or anyone who commits any kind of crime, violent or otherwise, against a woman. In case you're unfamiliar with this line of rhetoric, it's the one that goes like this: You should stop defending the rapists and start caring about the victim. Imagine if she was your sister, or your daughter, or your wife. What you are actually doing is perpetuating rape culture by advancing the idea that a woman is only valuable in so much as she is loved or valued by a man.