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student debt

The province is making sweeping changes to OSAP and tuition.
It's not the loans that need fixing. It's the education itself.
This is pretty big: graduating high school! It's a major accomplishment. Now, for the first time, you get to decide what your next steps will be. College? University? Both are exciting options, but there is one important question you need to answer.
When corruption and callous disregard for the marginalized can be so richly rewarded, what incentive do my students have for being good? When cheating does not preclude you from occupying the highest office in the province, why should they listen to my warnings about plagiarism?
Justin Trudeau is perpetuating a myth about the middle class. In reality, it has devolved into a new working class that is both white collar and blue collar - a world defined by massive levels of student debt, sky-high housing prices and the perpetual cycle of short-term contract work without benefits.
From the students I've talked to, many think that scholarship and bursaries are only available to top grade earners, but the truth is -- that there are many options available for students across every discipline of study, diverse background and level of study. The catch to getting this free money?
Earning under $25,000? You can hold off on those student debt payments.
No wonder student debt is soaring.
The Canada Child Benefit is a new program aimed at helping families with the cost of raising children today and into the future. This is the week when the cheques (or direct deposits) are set to arrive. I'm optimistic that the money will prompt some families to open up a Registered Education Savings Plan for their kids.
As rent prices continue to soar across Canada, here are a few ways you can take matters into your own hands and minimize your rent in the city -- legally.
While New Brunswick offers more post-secondary tuition grants, Newfoundland takes them away.
Photo of Winston Churchill As a result I am very excited about the potential of British Columbia's New Curriculum. It concedes
Hearing directly from students about issues they care deeply about was a great experience. As a Premier whose top priority is to ensure everyone can get a good job, it's my job to fix these problems. It's my job to erase any worries people have that a college or university education is out of reach. And it's my job to make it easier for more young people to continue learning and pursuing their passions after high school. That's why, as announced in last week's Ontario 2016 Budget, we are making the single-largest modernization of student financial assistance in the history of our province.
From buying a new winter coat and gift exchanges with friends, to purchasing a ticket home and celebrating the end of exams, there is no doubt that the holidays and New Year's Eve can put stress on a student's finances.
After six weeks at school, students may be surprised by how much it actually costs to live independently. When I first moved out on my own, I was amazed by all the hidden costs. Living at home, my parents covered most expenses -- from groceries to toiletries -- and I never gave it a second thought.
We're not waiting for parties to take us seriously, we're going to the polls to show them we're serious about electing candidates who make postsecondary education a priority in a meaningful way. We need to hear of plans for reduced tuition fees, increased access to grants and forgiven student debt. This election, students know the stakes. Students don't need to be convinced to vote for an abstract reason -- the truth is as a student, you must vote this election because if you don't, you're giving our next government permission to continue ignoring you and your future.
The average Canadian comes out of school with around $27,000 worth of debt and, based on an entry level job, the monthly payment will take up a significant amount of your disposable income. When I graduated, I traveled Europe for three months and then bought my first condo. It was all because of the steps I had taken when I was in school. Make sure that you sow the seeds of your financial success now.
A recent piece by the CBC states credit card debt has spiked among students over the past five to 10 years. However, this conflicts with reports that students are eschewing credit cards altogether. So, what's the real story on student consumer debt? To find out, we asked 820 Canadians born between 1990 and 1996 about their debt perspectives.
Like many Canadian teens, I grew up not learning about basic household budgeting, so when I went to university for the first time I was a little lost. I made mistakes. I got into debt. I spent more than I had. Then I realized how hard it was to pay off debt on an entry-level salary, and I got smart about my finances.
The post-secondary years are the ideal time to lock in great habits and fill any gaps in your children's financial education. Regardless of whether there are savings set aside or loans to be taken, managing the dollars matters. It's our young people who gain the most from good advice as they take on increased responsibility.