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suburbs

Toronto and Vancouver aren’t turning into New York and L.A. If they were, their suburbs would be cheaper.
Here are a five unexpected advantages that could tip the scales in favour of the outskirts.
"Decades-old car-dependent suburban sprawl" is leaving older people isolated.
There are many amazing places in Canada to call home. The upcoming generations of adults, often referred to as millennials, are quickly changing the landscape of our country, and where they're choosing to live may surprise you.
Halloween is upon us and with that comes the time for goofy costumes, candy and of course stories of ghosts and ghouls. The suburbs of Toronto are not without their own tales of ghostly sightings and paranormal activities that will keep you awake far into the night.
Agrihoods can also be potentially profitable, partly by attracting buyers and appreciating property values. Agritopia is not only self-sustaining, but actually generates revenue by selling produce to upscale restaurants and chefs.
No, it's not cheap to live here. And yes, we could have bought a house in the suburbs for the same cost as our condo, but that's the thing -- we don't want a house. We don't want extra square footage that we're going to fill with things we never use. We just want to live the life that feels right for us.
When you buy a house the first thing your eye goes to is the sticker price. But buying a home comes with a major hidden cost that doesn't show up in the MLS report: Transportation costs could more than eat up the savings of a lower-priced home in the suburbs. The concept is called location efficiency and it's the amount of time, energy and greenhouse gas emissions you spend getting from where you live to the workplace as well as your other frequent trips. And location efficiency may be the secret sauce to saving money and getting that house in the neighborhood you never thought you could afford.
For some the fear of failure looms over Christmas dinner like the ghost of guilt trips past, and for others it's just a regular wintry day deserving of delicious eats. Either way, if you are in the GTA, don't stress! The 'burbs are filled with plenty of delicious dining spots where December 25th is just another business day, open to everyone.
To borrow a popular internet meme, what if I told you we could build suburbs that preserved the natural landscape, had super energy efficient homes, built a sense of community and had no vinyl siding. Well we can, and the neighborhood of Echohaven, in the northwest community of Rocky Ridge in Calgary is doing precisely that. The homes of Echohaven must be super energy efficient, collect rainwater and are located in an oasis of nature. Echohaven has turned the modern process of building a neighbourhood on its ear
On an average weekday, 1.6 million people use public transit to navigate Canada's largest city, relying on the Toronto Transit Commission's four subway lines, 11 streetcar routes, and more than 140 bus routes to reach their destinations. Writer Dominic Ali spoke with University of Toronto expert Matti Siemiatycki about where Toronto's transit has been and where it's heading.
Toronto is more than Ford Nation, true, but it is also so much more than the Core. Let me tell you about my Toronto. Toronto is getting a Jamaican beef patty on a fresh portuguese bun at Eglinton and Oakwood. Toronto is getting congee rice porridge in North Scarborough. Toronto is so much more than the Core or the car-centric suburbs.
Today, close to 70 per cent of all Canadians live in suburbs. Most bought homes early in their adult life. Most raised families. And many are now living alone or with an aging spouse in houses designed for four to six people. The kids have grown and left, so nearby schools are unsupportable, too. Even the strip malls are failing as old neighbourhoods hollow out -- as young buyers head to ever-more distant points in search of the latest "cheap" development.
What do garages have to do with speeding? In suburbs all over North America, front garages are causing ripple effects that change the design and nature of our neighbourhoods in many ways that we don't initially realize.
The Suburban Revolution conference held at York University in Toronto highlighted the diversity of suburbs in the Greater Toronto Area and around the world, emphasizing an area too often neglected by policy-makers, academics and journalists. Toronto's chief planner, Jennifer Keesmaat, has asserted that suburbs are not dying, but rather changing.