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tax reform

Revera, which is owned by a Canadian crown corporation, runs an aggressive scheme to dodge U.K. taxes, a new report says.
It would be far more effective to invest in ongoing, regular analysis of all major tax provisions.
Trudeau and Morneau are in some trouble: they are rich guys who said they'd go after other rich guys. But they went after the little guys instead.
Hyperbole in negotiations and politics is nothing new, but what is it that these doctors are hoping to achieve through these tactics?
The earlier Trudeau-Benson experience should inform today's initiative.
With the number of people calling themselves corporations tripling between 2001 and 2014, the time to act is now.
The reality of these proposed changes will create far more problems than they will solve.
Requiring millionaires to pay more tax is certainly not an attack on the middle class or mom-and-pop corner stores.
Government wants to draw a clear line between doctors and nurses, facetiously suggesting that hard-working nurses pay higher taxes than "lazy" doctors.
When companies or wealthy individuals dodge taxes, governments either have to cut back on essential services, such as health care and education, or make up the shortfall by levying higher taxes on everyone else. Both options see the poorest people lose out and the inequality gap grow.
By making it easier to navigate the tax rules and meet their obligations, Canadians will spend less time and less of their money on preparing their taxes, leaving more in their pockets. For Canadian businesses, productivity could improve as they spend less time, effort and capital dealing with tax compliance and red tape.
The Trudeau government seemingly called off the CRA from harassing Canada's charities on January 20. Well, not really, in fact. The Trudeau government's timidity so far in fixing this abuse of power by the previous government will probably result in some of Canada's most popular and important charities heading toward decertification and oblivion.
There are many expectations for this new government and we are all anxious to see how they deliver on their platform. Saying goodbye to boutique tax cuts that only benefit the few should help more of us and make the whole process of filing your tax return less painful.
The Conservative budget's failure to initiate a process of comprehensive tax reform is a missed opportunity to lift Canada's prospects for long-term prosperity and growth. Tax reform and simplification would improve Canada's international competitiveness, productivity and economic growth, from both a personal and corporate perspective.
Contrary to a recent Wall Street Journal editorial, introducing a national sales tax, or value-added tax (VAT) creates a real opportunity for the United States. The nation could shift from its heavy reliance on income taxes (both absolute and comparative) to a consumption tax without affecting the budget deficit.
The case for change has never been stronger. If they want to do more than duct tape a broken system, Justin Trudeau, Thomas Mulcair and Elizabeth May need to adopt tax reform as a major thrust in their campaigns. So far, all we hear are general platitudes that avoid the real business of change. They underestimate voters' growing distrust of the current system.
"Time to end poverty in Canada" has been the message from the Salvation Army coming across our TV screens this holiday season. A great idea from an organization that fights poverty every day in our country -- but is it realistic? Yes, it is. Poverty doesn't just cost the poor their dignity and a reasonable standard of living, it costs us all.
The Conservatives should be commended for sticking to their commitment to the balance budget. But balancing the budget cannot become an end in itself or it can come to serve as a justification for spending increases with limited economic benefit. Reducing personal income tax rates and capital gains taxes would be a productive use of future surpluses.
One item sorely missing from the B.C. finance minister's recent budget was a plan to make the province's business taxes more competitive and attractive for investment. When the province shifted back to the PST last year, the cost of doing business and investing increased dramatically. Disappointingly, de Jong's budget did nothing to address this shackle around BC's economy. Tax reform, however, might be the light at the end of tunnel.