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ted x

I desperately tried to HIDE my story. After my stroke, I hated the attention I received. I was lucky to have had a successful recovery but I did not understand why it was such a big deal, why newspapers wanted to write about it and why every single person I saw would make it the focus of a conversation.
I have been asked many times as to how I got the opportunity to do two different TEDx talks. I'd like to share my 10 tips
We all have the choice to give up or tackle our challenge. There are many different challenges we will all face in our lives. I hope that my story of the biggest challenge I've faced so far, and my decision to push forward everyday will inspire you to also make the choice to tackle any challenge you face.
I had to be in the moment because my brain would not allow me to think ahead. As I was speaking, it terrified me. What if I would forget my next line? But it was a blessing. I was forced to be present, in that moment and think about the emotions in my story.
With "Future Day" a week away, there have been many recent articles on "What Did Back To The Future Get Right?" Rather than bore you with a typical comparison, I thought I'd take a different approach, and highlight how both the BTTF trilogy and Demolition Man made technological predictions of a more inclusive and accessible world.
Looking back on the past six years, the team is often asked how we managed to grow a simple 100-person event organized in just eight weeks to a 1,000+ person conference, streamed to thousands more online, which has become the most watched TEDx event in Canada and one of the largest in the world.
In a moving video, veteran B.C. broadcaster Tamara Taggart compares her son to a tumour — and changes how we think about
Good leaders can deliver inspiration, but it's great leaders that facilitate mobilization. People become citizens, and citizens become leaders. The theme "make it yours" should resonate with the spirit of individual accountability. It's up to everyone in the audience (and beyond) to take those words of inspiration and turn them into action. Make a commitment to taking action and getting connected with your neighborhoods, communities, or the global village. Make a difference!
Before we left Kampala, Uganda's capital, it was a daily occurrence for me as a young child to see dead bodies in the street and to fall asleep to the sounds of machine guns and screams. And when my father failed to come home, I always thought that his voice was one of those screams I heard in the night.
I'm hoping to inspire others to follow their dreams and help the environment at the same time. I'll be talking about what inspired me to design and build a solar car, and then what I decided to do with it and what happened in the process and what I was able to accomplish in the end. The dream, the struggle, the victory!
Right now, except when you go to the ballot box, the only time you're in touch with government is when you're complaining about something. You never just call to say, "Hey my garbage pick up is always on time and my bins are always upright. And I appreciate that." It's almost never a positive exchange of appreciation, and it's light-years away from being playful. I think the TEDx audience will be receptive to thinking about how something super-serious and formal can be playful.
We need to redefine leadership as being about lollipop moments, how many of them we create, how many of them we acknowledge, how many of them we pay forward, and how many of them we say thank you for. Because we've made leadership about changing the world, and there is no world, there are only six billion understandings of it
For some kids, the neighbourhood is what they know, their safety blanket. And for some reason, they won't leave. What we don't have in our communities is deep investment. Once we get past those defences we can start talking about credit, and how you can obtain it, how you can walk into a meeting place to achieve what you're passionate about achieving. We start taking the intuitive skills they have learned from living in the hood. Desperation breeds ingenuity. It's the idea of creatively understanding the skills and ideas that are there in these communities and what's necessary to support them: deep investment, time, understanding, and capital.
2012-09-04-tedx.jpg This year, TEDxToronto is looking for delegates to attend our biggest conference ever on October 26. With talks from the likes of SlutWalk co-founders Heather Jarvis and Sonya Barnett, in vitro meat advocate Isha Datar, and celebrity chef Susur Lee, there are bound to be sparks on stage, but the real magic will happen in the audience.
The word "conference" has developed bit of a bad reputation as of late. CEOs and community organizers have begun to think of the word "conference" as being synonymous with "boring," "tedious" or "unoriginal." And they're right.
While I believe one needs to have altruistic tendencies to commit to a volunteer position, I just as firmly believe that some of the most awe-inspiring and powerful examples of volunteerism are often rooted in selfish motives. I believe this because I have witnessed it firsthand.