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ted x toronto

Before alphabets were developed by the earliest civilizations, humans communicated with symbols and signals that have evolved with us over time from to become the universal language we share across the entire human species.
Great ideas have the potential to change everything. However, these ideas need to be shared, discussed and acted upon or they will dissolve and simply not make the impact they were intended to. Crossing a threshold -- whether a breaking point or a boundary, frequently results in a transformation.
Looking back on the past six years, the team is often asked how we managed to grow a simple 100-person event organized in just eight weeks to a 1,000+ person conference, streamed to thousands more online, which has become the most watched TEDx event in Canada and one of the largest in the world.
I can't help but look back on 2014 with such gratitude. For Kids Right To Know, it's been our biggest and busiest year so far. I could fill many pages telling you about all the things we've accomplished, but I'll settle for the following highlights...
It's a little over a week until this year's Autumnal Equinox, the day that marks the familiar transition from summer to fall. All the way south, a few dozen ragged souls are living at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, awaiting the return of light. They've been trapped there since February, keeping the place running through six-month night.
My talk explored some of the food-related problems shared by most North Americans. I propose that new problems don't always need new solutions and that preserving food could be a practical, time and money saving solution to some of our struggles.
As the first Aboriginal woman to present at TEDxToronto, I shared with the audience how the tides are shifting in the Indigenous community in ways that affect all Canadians. Listen to my talk to learn why.
TEDxToronto marked its 5th anniversary at Koerner Hall at The Royal Conservatory of Music this week. Since its humble beginnings in 2009 -- the TEDx movement in Toronto has grown tremendously with a slew of impressive speakers and sold out crowds.
"We're here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise, why else even be here?" -- Steve Jobs I came of age in the early 90s
In our culture, it is often said that it is easier to step where someone else has stepped before you. This rings true for career and leadership development. We need to continue to build pathways for Aboriginal people to develop and succeed in meaningful careers.
Here is a challenge: thinking back on all the people you have passed by today, how many do you actually remember? I would bet good money that even though you may have crossed paths with hundreds or even thousands of people today, you can only remember just one or two new faces, if any at all!
Each year, a minimum of two talks from the TedxToronto stage have made it to TED.com. The conference has grown by leaps and bounds each year, and is now currently one of the top speaker series in Toronto. This year's talks will provoke us to disagree, discuss, share, and challenge our previously held beliefs. Could you ask for anything more?
Right now, except when you go to the ballot box, the only time you're in touch with government is when you're complaining about something. You never just call to say, "Hey my garbage pick up is always on time and my bins are always upright. And I appreciate that." It's almost never a positive exchange of appreciation, and it's light-years away from being playful. I think the TEDx audience will be receptive to thinking about how something super-serious and formal can be playful.
We need to redefine leadership as being about lollipop moments, how many of them we create, how many of them we acknowledge, how many of them we pay forward, and how many of them we say thank you for. Because we've made leadership about changing the world, and there is no world, there are only six billion understandings of it
For some kids, the neighbourhood is what they know, their safety blanket. And for some reason, they won't leave. What we don't have in our communities is deep investment. Once we get past those defences we can start talking about credit, and how you can obtain it, how you can walk into a meeting place to achieve what you're passionate about achieving. We start taking the intuitive skills they have learned from living in the hood. Desperation breeds ingenuity. It's the idea of creatively understanding the skills and ideas that are there in these communities and what's necessary to support them: deep investment, time, understanding, and capital.