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throne speech

Canada is prepping its economy for a second wave of COVID-19. The U.S. is a different story.
On Thursday, the Alberta premier reacted harshly to the throne speech.
Quality daycare needs to be part of Canada's economic infrastructure.
The prime minister said surging COVID-19 cases has Canada at a “crossroads.”
The government is promising a plan to create one million jobs.
Canada has been talking about basic income for nearly 50 years.
"Our focus right now is on the COVID crisis," the prime minister says.
The NDP leader says his party is ready for an election, “but it’s not our goal.”
This change of heart has even the most experienced political analysts scratching their heads and trying to figure out what exactly the Liberals end game in all of this is.
If last year's provincial budget could be described as "petty" after Finance Minister Mike de Jong doled out an increase in assistance rates for those living with disabilities -- only to claw most of it back by ending the subsidized bus pass program -- this year's budget could best be described as "petulant."
"Now is not the time to raise taxes."
Just as Trudeau did when he invited the public to the swearing-in of his cabinet ministers at Rideau Hall, or by meeting with the provincial and territorial ministers for the first time since 2009, or by attending the UN climate change summit with his provincial counterparts and opposition leaders, Trudeau is signalling that his is a different government. Gone is Stephen Harper's uncaring, exclusionary and secretive government. Instead, the Liberals are saying, they will be open, transparent, collaborative and caring. Time will tell whether they hold true to those promises.
The leaders were quick to point out what Liberals left out of their throne speech.
After a month of prorogation and a shuttered Parliament, MPs at last returned to the Hill for the Government's Speech from the Throne laying out its new agenda for the Second Session of the Forty-First Parliament of Canada. One commentator described the Speech as "a breathtaking spout of free-associating bloviation... an epic ramble".
To achieve the target of eliminating the deficit by 2015-16, the government announced new commitments that are intended to restrain the growth of spending. This is perhaps partly in recognition of the slow economic growth environment and the fact that robust revenue growth cannot be counted on as the sole basis for returning to balance.
Why not be truly bold and lead Canada Post into a new era of better banking services for Canadians? Indeed, the union has presented a sound and compelling idea to serve the public, make money and create jobs, but the crown corporation is saying no, we're not interested in better serving the public, making more money and creating more jobs!
In the recent throne speech, the federal government announced a variety of initiatives but the one that drew much attention was its ostensible consumer-friendly tack. To help consumers, especially those with the lowest incomes, the federal government doesn't need to micro-manage airline tickets. It could instead focus on the big picture.
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg Well, so much for a "different kind" of throne speech. Though Minister Moore and his bored allies in the press had gone out of their way to hype the idea that yesterday's state-of-the-Tory-agenda address to Parliament would be laser-like in its focus on the plight of Canada's middle-class consumers, Stephen Harper's #SFT13 ended up sounding very much like all the others -- hashtag notwithstanding.
Mother Nature seems to be a little out of sorts these days. In excruciating detail, the IPCC documents her unhappiness with anthropogenic (a.k.a. man-made) activity. She is even giving some early warnings directly to the PM and his Minister of the Environment. Mother Nature is not impressed and neither are Canadians.