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Tobacco

The new regulations will strip packages of brand logos and colours in an attempt to reduce the appeal of tobacco products
Adopting standardized packaging policy is crucial in protecting the health of Canadians, and will have international significance.
Canada is moving too far, too fast to legalize recreational cannabis use, even though marijuana is addictive, dangerous and toxic.
It is time for the federal government to slow down the runaway train of plain packaging legislation until all the benefits and impacts have been identified.
Among the Liberal Party of Canada's stated goals before the last election was to introduce Australian-style plain packaging laws for tobacco products. This appeared under the guise of improving public health, especially for impressionable teenagers.
A large majority of people do not smoke, or no longer smoke, and tend to accept certain bits of conventional wisdom without question. Smoking tobacco being harmful to one's health, smokers therefore need to be protected--even those who would choose to, say, patronize their own smoking restaurants and bars. And we can count on government to enforce regulations and bans to this effect. But what if smokers get something from their "vice," and that this can be explained in economic terms? The answer could be found in the concept of consumer surplus.
Despite the millions in proposed new spending for getting Canadians unhooked off tobacco, fewer Canadians are lighting up. Looking at the numbers, it seems that even without a heavy handed government, fewer Canadians are using tobacco every year. So what changed?
In the U.S. and Canada, thousands of mom and pop vape shops are popping up around urban centers, and there's reason to think these devices could be more successful than legislation in getting smokers to quit.
Countries such as Iran, India and China proposed initiatives to limit the market of tobacco and further enforce plain packaging regulations. Many of these initiatives were adopted and will have to be enforced by Canada as a party to the convention. But at no point did the Canadian people get a say.
A Students For Liberty activist carries a protest sign at the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco
I've heard before that smoking hookah is fine for your health and not at all like smoking cigarettes. To set the record straight and find out how hookah smoking can affect our health, I spoke to Bonnie Bristow, a Sunnybrook radiation therapist and leader on the Smoking Cessation Team.
Smoking cigarettes doubles the risk of changes in the lens of your eye, resulting in cataracts... It triples the risk of age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness over 65 years old. And it also increases the risk of glaucoma, another leading risk of blindness.
Restrictions implemented in Australia have resulted in no meaningful decrease in already downwardly trending tobacco consumption rates -- and virtually no impact whatsoever in youth consumption rates in particular. Can Canada expect plain packaging regulation to offer any real improvements to smoking rates?
Prompted by World Tobacco Day, activists from the international grassroots activist group Students For Liberty took to Parliament Hill on Tuesday to hand out their "No Nanny" plain-packaged chocolate bars to legislators and federal employees.
It is important to know that unlike other types of cancers, lung cancer doesn't show symptoms until in much later stages. This means that by the time an individual begins to notice changes to his or her health, the cancer has significantly advanced, often making treatment more complex. However, there is still hope.
For 24 years I was a smoker. That's nearly a quarter century of inhaling smoke into lungs that are probably black by now. But I loved it. I'd start the day with a smoke and a coffee, and I'd have that last cigarette at the end of my day. When my partner and I were expecting our first-born, I finally made the decision that I was ready to stop.
The Making Healthier Choices Act -- true Orwellian doublespeak -- treats vaping as if it was as harmful as smoking. This imaginative warping of the facts requires the province to ignore the growing scientific evidence that whether inhaled directly or second-hand, vaping has not been strongly associated with the negative health effects of inhaling combusted tobacco products.
In terms of medical treatment, tobacco use also costs Canada's health care system an estimated $4.4 billion per year. In comparison, studies of cannabis use have not shown any increased susceptibility to physical illness or premature death.
Since 2009, Health Canada has taken the position that e-cigarettes containing nicotine are illegal. But out on the streets, Health Canada is simply being ignored. There's a brisk trade in vaping supplies including nicotine. Much of the new legislation might be found unconstitutional if challenged in the courts. Nicotine addicts who still use tobacco as a delivery method are suffering harm to their health that now appears to be quite unnecessary.
Beyond the war of statistics, the principles of liberty and personal responsibility must be brought back to the heart of discussions about tobacco consumption, or consumption of any other product deemed "harmful" to one's health. You don't need to be a radical libertarian to start to ask some serious questions regarding the tendency of certain groups to want to regiment all aspects of people's lives under the pretext of protecting their health.